Citation

The Impact that Education and Religion Played in the Plight of African Americans in Gaining Economic Empowerment

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Abstract:

Association for the Study of African American Life and History Conference

Theme: The History of Black Economic Empowerment
September 29 - October 3, 2010 Raleigh, NC

Title of paper/panel: “The Impact that Education and Religion Played in the Plight of African Americans in Gaining Economic Empowerment”

Author/Presenter: Dr. Willie J. Kimmons, PhD.

Affiliation: Save Children Save Schools, Inc.

Address: 1653 Lawrence Circle, Daytona Beach, FL 32117

Telephone: (386) 451-4780 Email: wjkimmons@aol.com

Web site: www.savechildrensaveschools.com


ABSTRACT

This presentation will address the struggles that African Americans endured and overcame to address the issues of racism with religion and education in this country. Strategies and suggestions on how not to let history repeat itself will be explored. There have been two main ingredients that have sustained us as a race of people, religion and education. Even though we were forced to build our own churches, public schools and colleges, African Americans endured against the odds and prevailed by building some of the most solid religious and educational structures in this country. Spiritual guidance along with trained and disciplined educated minds was the key to our survival. As a result of these two variables, religion and education, the history of Black Economic Empowerment was born.

Black churches and Black colleges brought about a Black middle class. It brought about Black thriving communities, quality trained teachers, preachers, civic leaders, community leaders, fraternities and sororities, business clubs and organizations. Black people felt worthy as a result of their economic empowerment. Black pride was a major cry around the country. Black people were self-sufficient, independent and self producing. Black men were taking care of their families and building homes. Land ownership and education were two driving forces that propelled African Americans to be successful in the early years of our struggle. Black economic empowerment let African Americans see what they could do for themselves and be successful and productive in doing these things on their own. Interactive/group participation will be utilized.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436109_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Kimmons, Willie. "The Impact that Education and Religion Played in the Plight of African Americans in Gaining Economic Empowerment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436109_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kimmons, W. J. , 2010-09-29 "The Impact that Education and Religion Played in the Plight of African Americans in Gaining Economic Empowerment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436109_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Association for the Study of African American Life and History Conference

Theme: The History of Black Economic Empowerment
September 29 - October 3, 2010 Raleigh, NC

Title of paper/panel: “The Impact that Education and Religion Played in the Plight of African Americans in Gaining Economic Empowerment”

Author/Presenter: Dr. Willie J. Kimmons, PhD.

Affiliation: Save Children Save Schools, Inc.

Address: 1653 Lawrence Circle, Daytona Beach, FL 32117

Telephone: (386) 451-4780 Email: wjkimmons@aol.com

Web site: www.savechildrensaveschools.com


ABSTRACT

This presentation will address the struggles that African Americans endured and overcame to address the issues of racism with religion and education in this country. Strategies and suggestions on how not to let history repeat itself will be explored. There have been two main ingredients that have sustained us as a race of people, religion and education. Even though we were forced to build our own churches, public schools and colleges, African Americans endured against the odds and prevailed by building some of the most solid religious and educational structures in this country. Spiritual guidance along with trained and disciplined educated minds was the key to our survival. As a result of these two variables, religion and education, the history of Black Economic Empowerment was born.

Black churches and Black colleges brought about a Black middle class. It brought about Black thriving communities, quality trained teachers, preachers, civic leaders, community leaders, fraternities and sororities, business clubs and organizations. Black people felt worthy as a result of their economic empowerment. Black pride was a major cry around the country. Black people were self-sufficient, independent and self producing. Black men were taking care of their families and building homes. Land ownership and education were two driving forces that propelled African Americans to be successful in the early years of our struggle. Black economic empowerment let African Americans see what they could do for themselves and be successful and productive in doing these things on their own. Interactive/group participation will be utilized.


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