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The Economic Impact of Congressional Black Caucus Members in the 110th Congress

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Abstract:

The idea of directing federal money to specific local projects originally came from Rep. John Calhoun (D-S.C.) when he proposed the Bonus Bill of 1817 to construct highways linking the East and South of the United States to its Western frontier. At the time, these projects were referred to as "internal improvements." Calhoun wanted to use the earnings bonus from the Second Bank of the United States specifically for this program, arguing that the General Welfare and Post Roads clauses of the US Constitution called for it. President James Madison vetoed the bill as unconstitutional. Subsequently, earmarking has become commonplace.

According to the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, more than 9,000 Black Elected Officials exist on the federal, state and local levels of government. This raises the question: Is there an economic benefit to having an African American representative in office? In recent years, there has been an escalation in African American earnings to the tune of $40 Billion per annum. However, do African Americans invest in their politics? Utilizing searchable databases and FEC filings, this project seeks to explore the nature of the economic relationship between senior Congressional Black Caucus members and the African American communities they serve from 2008 to 2010. To what degree, if any, were their elections and re-election funded by African American organizations? How much, if at all, were their targeted earmarks directed to their Congressional Districts?
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436112_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Rogers, Ph.D., Dennis. "The Economic Impact of Congressional Black Caucus Members in the 110th Congress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436112_index.html>

APA Citation:

Rogers, Ph.D., D. , 2010-09-29 "The Economic Impact of Congressional Black Caucus Members in the 110th Congress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436112_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The idea of directing federal money to specific local projects originally came from Rep. John Calhoun (D-S.C.) when he proposed the Bonus Bill of 1817 to construct highways linking the East and South of the United States to its Western frontier. At the time, these projects were referred to as "internal improvements." Calhoun wanted to use the earnings bonus from the Second Bank of the United States specifically for this program, arguing that the General Welfare and Post Roads clauses of the US Constitution called for it. President James Madison vetoed the bill as unconstitutional. Subsequently, earmarking has become commonplace.

According to the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, more than 9,000 Black Elected Officials exist on the federal, state and local levels of government. This raises the question: Is there an economic benefit to having an African American representative in office? In recent years, there has been an escalation in African American earnings to the tune of $40 Billion per annum. However, do African Americans invest in their politics? Utilizing searchable databases and FEC filings, this project seeks to explore the nature of the economic relationship between senior Congressional Black Caucus members and the African American communities they serve from 2008 to 2010. To what degree, if any, were their elections and re-election funded by African American organizations? How much, if at all, were their targeted earmarks directed to their Congressional Districts?


Similar Titles:
The Impact of African-American Members on Congress

Moving Beyond Mavericks: Competing Conceptions of Individual Member Vote Misclassifications in the 75th to 110th Congresses


 
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