Citation

African American Barbers: An Economic Force in the Black Community

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Abstract:

A B S T R A C T: BLACK BARBERS, A GLORIOUS HISTORY:
African American Barbers, an Economic Force Underpinning the Black Community

It is to Africa that our quest for authenticity begins. . . . groups or tribes sought to distinguish themselves by facial designs whether through markings, patterns of hair growth, implements through the nose or distinguishing lip features like the plates in the lower lips of some African women. . . .Barbers not only cut hair but were also the spiritual leaders, surgeons and dentist.

The majority of barbers in Baltimore, Charleston, Mobile, and Richmond by 1850 were Negroes. In 1860 before slavery ended one out of eight Negroes worth more than $2000, which was a lot of money then, owned a barber shop. . . .It is in the Negro community that the story of the black barbers seems to have been lost, and yet it is through them that the financial underpinnings of black society, much of the funding for civil rights and our economic viability have rested.

Madam C. J. Walker is well noted for her entrepreneurial success in hair care industries, but at least four African American men of distinction stand out in recorded history among our barbers:
William T. Johnson, a barber in Natchez Mississippi, an entrepreneur with a barber shop and bath house as well as land holder.
Daniel Hale Williams, a barber did the first successful open heart surgery operation.
John Merrick, one of the three men credited with founding Durham’s North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company was a barber.
Lafayette A. Tillman an African-American Barber and Policeman
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436132_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Fisher, Ada. "African American Barbers: An Economic Force in the Black Community" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436132_index.html>

APA Citation:

Fisher, A. , 2010-09-29 "African American Barbers: An Economic Force in the Black Community" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436132_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A B S T R A C T: BLACK BARBERS, A GLORIOUS HISTORY:
African American Barbers, an Economic Force Underpinning the Black Community

It is to Africa that our quest for authenticity begins. . . . groups or tribes sought to distinguish themselves by facial designs whether through markings, patterns of hair growth, implements through the nose or distinguishing lip features like the plates in the lower lips of some African women. . . .Barbers not only cut hair but were also the spiritual leaders, surgeons and dentist.

The majority of barbers in Baltimore, Charleston, Mobile, and Richmond by 1850 were Negroes. In 1860 before slavery ended one out of eight Negroes worth more than $2000, which was a lot of money then, owned a barber shop. . . .It is in the Negro community that the story of the black barbers seems to have been lost, and yet it is through them that the financial underpinnings of black society, much of the funding for civil rights and our economic viability have rested.

Madam C. J. Walker is well noted for her entrepreneurial success in hair care industries, but at least four African American men of distinction stand out in recorded history among our barbers:
William T. Johnson, a barber in Natchez Mississippi, an entrepreneur with a barber shop and bath house as well as land holder.
Daniel Hale Williams, a barber did the first successful open heart surgery operation.
John Merrick, one of the three men credited with founding Durham’s North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company was a barber.
Lafayette A. Tillman an African-American Barber and Policeman


Similar Titles:
How Africana Studies is Reinvigorating an Historic Black Community: The Case of the African American and African Studies Community Extension Center at The Ohio State University

Black Gated Fences: African American Coastal Communities and the Making of Modern Black Conservatism

The Methods to our Blackness: Defining a Phenomenon Using Grounded Theory in the African American Community


 
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