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Black Migration to the Frontier: The Longtown Settlement

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Abstract:

The Longtown Settlement straddles the border of western Darke County, Ohio, and eastern Randolph County, Indiana. First settled in 1822 by free-born African Americans James and Sofia Clemens, the Longtown Settlement grew to nearly 900 inhabitants during the 19th century. By the 1990s, fewer than ten farm families remained. Early residents of Longtown were largely freed slaves and free Black families who migrated from North Carolina and Virginia. Several accompanied Quaker families who were moving West. The settlement was situated just a few miles north of Newport, Indiana, which was a major underground railroad stop operated by Levi and Catherine Coffin.

Residents of Longtown experienced economic success as farmers, craftspersons, and shopkeepers. As a border state, however, Indiana’s ambiguous political record eventually forced African Americans to migrate to northern states. This study build on the work of Stephen A. Vincent, whose study of African American Farm Communities in the Midwest shed light on the Roberts and Beech settlements in Indiana. Additional sources of information include census materials, oral interviews with the descendants of Longtown, church and school records, newspaper accounts, and secondary sources. Of particular importance are two on-going investigations: an archaeological survey of the Clemens House and the Union Literary Institute, a manual labor boarding school attended by Longtown residents, and an historic preservation study of the Union Literary Institute. Both of these investigations are being conducted by Ball State University.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436171_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Beilke, Jayne. "Black Migration to the Frontier: The Longtown Settlement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436171_index.html>

APA Citation:

Beilke, J. R. "Black Migration to the Frontier: The Longtown Settlement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436171_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: The Longtown Settlement straddles the border of western Darke County, Ohio, and eastern Randolph County, Indiana. First settled in 1822 by free-born African Americans James and Sofia Clemens, the Longtown Settlement grew to nearly 900 inhabitants during the 19th century. By the 1990s, fewer than ten farm families remained. Early residents of Longtown were largely freed slaves and free Black families who migrated from North Carolina and Virginia. Several accompanied Quaker families who were moving West. The settlement was situated just a few miles north of Newport, Indiana, which was a major underground railroad stop operated by Levi and Catherine Coffin.

Residents of Longtown experienced economic success as farmers, craftspersons, and shopkeepers. As a border state, however, Indiana’s ambiguous political record eventually forced African Americans to migrate to northern states. This study build on the work of Stephen A. Vincent, whose study of African American Farm Communities in the Midwest shed light on the Roberts and Beech settlements in Indiana. Additional sources of information include census materials, oral interviews with the descendants of Longtown, church and school records, newspaper accounts, and secondary sources. Of particular importance are two on-going investigations: an archaeological survey of the Clemens House and the Union Literary Institute, a manual labor boarding school attended by Longtown residents, and an historic preservation study of the Union Literary Institute. Both of these investigations are being conducted by Ball State University.


Similar Titles:
The Boundary-work of Internal Migration: Evidence from Black Migration to the South

Black Women, Capital Formation and Black Capitalism in the Urban Context:From Madame C.J.Walker, Mary Kay to Sylvia’s Restaurant and Beyond:Gender, the Great Migration and Black Capitalism

Migrating Subjects, Black Demands: Articulating Black Citizenship in the British Empire


 
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