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Gender, Masculinity, and Power in the 1960s Urban Rebellions

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Abstract:

The 1960s urban uprisings occurred contemporaneously with the publication of the infamous, “Case for National Action: The Negro Family.” The author, Daniel Monyihan, even went so far as to suggest that these uprisings represented Black males response to the matriarchal structure of the Black family. Thus, though unproblematized, gender has been central to the discussion of the 1960s rebellions since these events took place. This paper uses gender analysis to interpret the urban rebellions, for three reasons. First, understanding this policy and discursive context is important in making sense of how the state responded to the rebellions. Second, by reading the role of gender and masculinity back into the rebellions it becomes apparent how participants displayed their masculinity to reassert power within the municipal structure. Finally, the rebellions should not be interpreted solely as exercises in Black masculinity. Women were present and fully engaged in the rebellions, and not confined to spectator or cheerleader roles. By fully investigating the roles women played in the uprisings, and why they were more likely to participate in non-criminal ways, a more complex story can be constructed demonstrating the broad collective nature of the events.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436181_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Howard, Ashley. "Gender, Masculinity, and Power in the 1960s Urban Rebellions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436181_index.html>

APA Citation:

Howard, A. M. , 2010-09-29 "Gender, Masculinity, and Power in the 1960s Urban Rebellions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436181_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The 1960s urban uprisings occurred contemporaneously with the publication of the infamous, “Case for National Action: The Negro Family.” The author, Daniel Monyihan, even went so far as to suggest that these uprisings represented Black males response to the matriarchal structure of the Black family. Thus, though unproblematized, gender has been central to the discussion of the 1960s rebellions since these events took place. This paper uses gender analysis to interpret the urban rebellions, for three reasons. First, understanding this policy and discursive context is important in making sense of how the state responded to the rebellions. Second, by reading the role of gender and masculinity back into the rebellions it becomes apparent how participants displayed their masculinity to reassert power within the municipal structure. Finally, the rebellions should not be interpreted solely as exercises in Black masculinity. Women were present and fully engaged in the rebellions, and not confined to spectator or cheerleader roles. By fully investigating the roles women played in the uprisings, and why they were more likely to participate in non-criminal ways, a more complex story can be constructed demonstrating the broad collective nature of the events.


Similar Titles:
Gender, Masculinity, and the 1960s Urban Rebellions

Gendered promises, gendered betrayals: the African urban crisis, masculinity and the public in Abidjan

The Root Causes of 1960s Urban Rebellions and Their Lingering Social and Political Effects on Urban America


 
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