Citation

Neo-Houstonian Studies: Edward W. Jacko, the NOI and the Struggle for Afro-Muslim Civil Liberties

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Abstract:

This paper explores the complexity of Charles H. Houston’s vision, strategy, and legacy as a legal scholar by examining his direct and indirect influence on the Nation of Islam’s legal struggle to defend the civil liberties of its members. By 1940, Houston began to alter his objectives at Howard University’s School of Law to meet the evolving legal needs of African Americans, reprioritizing the discussion of civil liberties such as freedom of religion within his course on civil rights. Whereas access to professionally competent and willing legal representation had eluded the Nation of Islam prior to this development, the emergence and retention of perceptively trained lawyers such as Edward W. Jacko, Jr., a former student in Houston’s revamped civil rights course, allowed the Nation of Islam to defend the religious beliefs of its members from a position of power. Nowhere was this new trajectory of Houston’s work more evident than in the legal drama surrounding NOI member Muhammad Ali, whose conscientious objection to serving in the U.S. military was initially contested by Charles H. Houston stalwart—Thurgood Marshall.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436194_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Crawford, Malachi. "Neo-Houstonian Studies: Edward W. Jacko, the NOI and the Struggle for Afro-Muslim Civil Liberties" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436194_index.html>

APA Citation:

Crawford, M. D. , 2010-09-29 "Neo-Houstonian Studies: Edward W. Jacko, the NOI and the Struggle for Afro-Muslim Civil Liberties" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436194_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the complexity of Charles H. Houston’s vision, strategy, and legacy as a legal scholar by examining his direct and indirect influence on the Nation of Islam’s legal struggle to defend the civil liberties of its members. By 1940, Houston began to alter his objectives at Howard University’s School of Law to meet the evolving legal needs of African Americans, reprioritizing the discussion of civil liberties such as freedom of religion within his course on civil rights. Whereas access to professionally competent and willing legal representation had eluded the Nation of Islam prior to this development, the emergence and retention of perceptively trained lawyers such as Edward W. Jacko, Jr., a former student in Houston’s revamped civil rights course, allowed the Nation of Islam to defend the religious beliefs of its members from a position of power. Nowhere was this new trajectory of Houston’s work more evident than in the legal drama surrounding NOI member Muhammad Ali, whose conscientious objection to serving in the U.S. military was initially contested by Charles H. Houston stalwart—Thurgood Marshall.


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Continuity and Change in Support for Civil Liberties after the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks: Results of a Panel Study

Dimensions of Tolerance: Media Framing and Its Impact on American Attitudes Toward Civil Liberties of Muslims in the United States

Critical Legal Studies and the Assault on Civil Liberties

Television, Civil Liberties, and Muslims of Middle Eastern Descent


 
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