Citation

Where Are All the Black Male Students? African Americans' School Achievement, the Social Psychology of Denial, and Arts Education as a Mediating Influence

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Abstract:

Abstract

Research has indicated that African Americans are often displaced in schools and males in particular, are denied access to quality academic programs and are tracked into vocational training, and some are even forced out of schools. Since the establishment of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1975, there has been growing interest in understanding the relationship between African American male students and special education assessment. In this research we explore the impact that the historic denial of educational equality and culturally responsive pedagogy has had on the disproportionately high placement of African American males in special education programs for the mentally disabled, and behaviorally and emotionally challenged. Our research reveals three primary catalysts for special education placement of African American male students: 1) persistent patterns of discrimination, 2) biases in assessments, and 3) social differences in students’ behaviors and learning styles. The findings further reveal that the integration of culturally responsive and reflective arts education into teacher pedagogy and curriculum helps to mediate school disengagement, and addresses the multiple intelligences and learning styles of African Americans. This research has important implications for teacher education programs, as it increases awareness and provides strategies and techniques for arts integration that may lead to higher levels of cognitive development and academic achievement in African Americans and the broader student population.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

school (102), student (95), educ (88), american (67), african (64), se (54), black (45), male (40), public (29), placement (28), art (28), program (25), cultur (25), 2007 (24), learn (24), white (22), 2009 (21), curriculum (21), segreg (21), 2005 (19), high (19),
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436229_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Walton, Calvin. and Wiggan, Greg. "Where Are All the Black Male Students? African Americans' School Achievement, the Social Psychology of Denial, and Arts Education as a Mediating Influence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436229_index.html>

APA Citation:

Walton, C. W. and Wiggan, G. , 2010-09-29 "Where Are All the Black Male Students? African Americans' School Achievement, the Social Psychology of Denial, and Arts Education as a Mediating Influence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina Online <PDF>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436229_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract

Research has indicated that African Americans are often displaced in schools and males in particular, are denied access to quality academic programs and are tracked into vocational training, and some are even forced out of schools. Since the establishment of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1975, there has been growing interest in understanding the relationship between African American male students and special education assessment. In this research we explore the impact that the historic denial of educational equality and culturally responsive pedagogy has had on the disproportionately high placement of African American males in special education programs for the mentally disabled, and behaviorally and emotionally challenged. Our research reveals three primary catalysts for special education placement of African American male students: 1) persistent patterns of discrimination, 2) biases in assessments, and 3) social differences in students’ behaviors and learning styles. The findings further reveal that the integration of culturally responsive and reflective arts education into teacher pedagogy and curriculum helps to mediate school disengagement, and addresses the multiple intelligences and learning styles of African Americans. This research has important implications for teacher education programs, as it increases awareness and provides strategies and techniques for arts integration that may lead to higher levels of cognitive development and academic achievement in African Americans and the broader student population.


Similar Titles:
“Let’s Stay Together: Racial Separation among African American High School Students Attending Predominately White Schools.”

"They Think They Helping Us": Black Male students and student teacher relationships at an urban high school


 
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