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Revolution Starts from Within: Student Politics on the Campus of North Carolina Central University, 1936-1963

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Abstract:

Revolution Starts from Within: Student Politics on the Campus of North Carolina Central University, 1936-1963.

When thinking in terms of student movement, politics, or unrest, events that are most commonly known are the Greensboro student sit-ins of the 1960s, and the Berkley revolt of the 1960s; additionally the creation of student organizations such as the Student Non Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) established during the civil rights movement and students revolting against the Vietnam war. The Greensboro sit-ins and SNCC were phenomenons that stemmed from North Carolina, moreover, historically black institutions. Through use of the student newspaper, this study will explore the history of student on-campus activity and North Carolina Central University.
The historiography of student politics is sizeable but very concentrated, much of the literature focuses on student unrest from an off campus activities perspective, mainly during the civil rights era. However, considerably less has been written on student unrest concerning on-campus activity especially black student unrest on campus. This paper seeks to widen the historiography of black student politics on campus by focusing strictly on student activities and the ideology during the administrations of James E. Shepard and Alfonso Elder at North Carolina Central University from 1936-1961.
Rarely does scholarship explain student activism from an on campus experience, and this paper has provided such a clarification. The account of student activism on North Carolina Central University’s campus is an interesting narrative, and using the student newspaper helped to unravel how students became active on campus. Although much of the scholarship has focused on off campus activity, understanding the campus atmosphere and student activism on campus before off campus actions may open up some new details as to why certain activities manifested the way they did. For instance, it may elucidate why students were so eager to revolt in the Greensboro sit-ins, and how SNCC became such a force in the 1960s. It is asserted that student newspapers should be considered a legitimate source, and in this particular case black newspapers should be considered the black press.
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Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436241_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Robinson, Brian. "Revolution Starts from Within: Student Politics on the Campus of North Carolina Central University, 1936-1963" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436241_index.html>

APA Citation:

Robinson, B. A. , 2010-09-29 "Revolution Starts from Within: Student Politics on the Campus of North Carolina Central University, 1936-1963" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436241_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Revolution Starts from Within: Student Politics on the Campus of North Carolina Central University, 1936-1963.

When thinking in terms of student movement, politics, or unrest, events that are most commonly known are the Greensboro student sit-ins of the 1960s, and the Berkley revolt of the 1960s; additionally the creation of student organizations such as the Student Non Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) established during the civil rights movement and students revolting against the Vietnam war. The Greensboro sit-ins and SNCC were phenomenons that stemmed from North Carolina, moreover, historically black institutions. Through use of the student newspaper, this study will explore the history of student on-campus activity and North Carolina Central University.
The historiography of student politics is sizeable but very concentrated, much of the literature focuses on student unrest from an off campus activities perspective, mainly during the civil rights era. However, considerably less has been written on student unrest concerning on-campus activity especially black student unrest on campus. This paper seeks to widen the historiography of black student politics on campus by focusing strictly on student activities and the ideology during the administrations of James E. Shepard and Alfonso Elder at North Carolina Central University from 1936-1961.
Rarely does scholarship explain student activism from an on campus experience, and this paper has provided such a clarification. The account of student activism on North Carolina Central University’s campus is an interesting narrative, and using the student newspaper helped to unravel how students became active on campus. Although much of the scholarship has focused on off campus activity, understanding the campus atmosphere and student activism on campus before off campus actions may open up some new details as to why certain activities manifested the way they did. For instance, it may elucidate why students were so eager to revolt in the Greensboro sit-ins, and how SNCC became such a force in the 1960s. It is asserted that student newspapers should be considered a legitimate source, and in this particular case black newspapers should be considered the black press.


Similar Titles:
Beauty and the Black Student Revolt: Black Student Activism and the Politics of Campus “Beauty” Spaces

Post-Punctuation Politics: The Evolution of Charter School Policy in North Carolina

Exploitation Within the Core: Historicizing Eastern North Carolina as an Internal and External Periphery


 
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