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From Shaw University to the Booker T. Washington of British Guiana: Hon. E.F. Fredericks and Contributions of HBCUs to the African Diaspora

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Abstract:

Three days after Hon. Edmund Fitzgerald Fredericks, LL.B., M.E.C., M.L.C. died, an eminent legal practitioner in the Supreme Court of British Guiana identified him as the then colony’s Booker T. Washington. On 10 April 1934, The Daily Chronicle, a widely read local newspaper noted the glowing tributes paid in the memory of Fredericks, the late “popular lawyer, politician, and social worker”. Fredericks, an alumnus of Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina had had a storied career in his homeland, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Born in the African Guyanese twin villages of Buxton-Friendship, East Coast Demerara, he became a schoolteacher before his sojourn abroad. Prior to his return to Guyana, he was intimately involved with a number of African Diaspora organizations and was acquainted with the work of luminaries such as W.E.B. DuBois, George Padmore, Harold Moody, Marcus Garvey, and Booker T. Washington. Of all those impressive personalities, the last named, Washington tremendously impacted on Fredericks’ life and works. As a result, in 1932, Fredericks spearheaded the drive to enroll two of the first Guyanese students at Tuskegee Institute. A few years after he died, his brainchildren, a local Tuskegee and a School of Home Economics were established in Guyana. Although at home and abroad the institutions were welcomed, Tuskegee Agricultural School soon foundered on the rocks of stormy relationships within the organization Fredericks had founded in 1922, the Negro Progress Convention (NPC). The School of Home Economics, named for him, functioned until the 1970s. This paper utilizes primary and secondary sources from repositories in the three countries mentioned above to examine the ways in which Guyanese, especially those of African and Indian descent, who were struggling under British colonialism were motivated to idolize and to utilize the ideals and ideas of Booker T. Washington and created institutions to develop human capital, and to challenge stereotypes and the status quo. The paper emphasizes that local fundraising activities undertaken by the supporters of Washington and Fredericks enabled a cross-section of the Guyanese population to achieve political, social, and economic empowerment.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

frederick (8), washington (6), tuskege (5), booker (4), school (4), guyanes (4), home (4), local (4), econom (4), african (3), guyana (3), institut (3), british (3), univers (3), tribut (2), three (2), abroad (2), work (2), organ (2), court (2), paper (2),
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Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436247_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Josiah, Barbara. "From Shaw University to the Booker T. Washington of British Guiana: Hon. E.F. Fredericks and Contributions of HBCUs to the African Diaspora" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436247_index.html>

APA Citation:

Josiah, B. P. , 2010-09-29 "From Shaw University to the Booker T. Washington of British Guiana: Hon. E.F. Fredericks and Contributions of HBCUs to the African Diaspora" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436247_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Three days after Hon. Edmund Fitzgerald Fredericks, LL.B., M.E.C., M.L.C. died, an eminent legal practitioner in the Supreme Court of British Guiana identified him as the then colony’s Booker T. Washington. On 10 April 1934, The Daily Chronicle, a widely read local newspaper noted the glowing tributes paid in the memory of Fredericks, the late “popular lawyer, politician, and social worker”. Fredericks, an alumnus of Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina had had a storied career in his homeland, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Born in the African Guyanese twin villages of Buxton-Friendship, East Coast Demerara, he became a schoolteacher before his sojourn abroad. Prior to his return to Guyana, he was intimately involved with a number of African Diaspora organizations and was acquainted with the work of luminaries such as W.E.B. DuBois, George Padmore, Harold Moody, Marcus Garvey, and Booker T. Washington. Of all those impressive personalities, the last named, Washington tremendously impacted on Fredericks’ life and works. As a result, in 1932, Fredericks spearheaded the drive to enroll two of the first Guyanese students at Tuskegee Institute. A few years after he died, his brainchildren, a local Tuskegee and a School of Home Economics were established in Guyana. Although at home and abroad the institutions were welcomed, Tuskegee Agricultural School soon foundered on the rocks of stormy relationships within the organization Fredericks had founded in 1922, the Negro Progress Convention (NPC). The School of Home Economics, named for him, functioned until the 1970s. This paper utilizes primary and secondary sources from repositories in the three countries mentioned above to examine the ways in which Guyanese, especially those of African and Indian descent, who were struggling under British colonialism were motivated to idolize and to utilize the ideals and ideas of Booker T. Washington and created institutions to develop human capital, and to challenge stereotypes and the status quo. The paper emphasizes that local fundraising activities undertaken by the supporters of Washington and Fredericks enabled a cross-section of the Guyanese population to achieve political, social, and economic empowerment.


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