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The Political Culture of Reconstruction’s New Spaces: The Saloon and Alternative Partisanship in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1869-1870

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Abstract:

Implementation of Reconstruction occurred at the local level. After the Reconstruction Acts black Wilmingtonians demanded political inclusion as both major political parties tried to exclude them from holding public office. Yet black officeholders would obtain a relatively high degree of political success in Wilmington as a result of a population majority and a vibrant political culture. Black officeholders immediately took the lead in abolishing race-based laws, many of which were remnants of slavery. The lifting of a law restricting blacks from distributing liquor had significant political ramifications. Allowing equal access to the business of liquor paved the way for the black owned saloon. But black owned saloons like William H. Moore’s did more than transform black business in downtown Wilmington, they also transformed the city’s black political culture. Moore’s Saloon opened in a perfect central location to Wilmington’s diverse black neighborhoods and quickly became a geographical hub of black politics. While Wilmington had a history of political organizing, even before emancipation, politics were traditionally centered in neighborhood churches. And while the saloon did not replace the church as the center of politics, it constructed the space for a different type of political dialogue. Furthermore, while there was much cross over, with many of the same people attending both church and saloon political meetings, the saloon included people that the church did not and visa versa. The saloon, a political space made possible through the implementation of Reconstruction law, was a crucial factor in Wilmington’s black political success.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436254_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Jackson, Thanayi. "The Political Culture of Reconstruction’s New Spaces: The Saloon and Alternative Partisanship in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1869-1870" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436254_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jackson, T. , 2010-09-29 "The Political Culture of Reconstruction’s New Spaces: The Saloon and Alternative Partisanship in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1869-1870" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436254_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Implementation of Reconstruction occurred at the local level. After the Reconstruction Acts black Wilmingtonians demanded political inclusion as both major political parties tried to exclude them from holding public office. Yet black officeholders would obtain a relatively high degree of political success in Wilmington as a result of a population majority and a vibrant political culture. Black officeholders immediately took the lead in abolishing race-based laws, many of which were remnants of slavery. The lifting of a law restricting blacks from distributing liquor had significant political ramifications. Allowing equal access to the business of liquor paved the way for the black owned saloon. But black owned saloons like William H. Moore’s did more than transform black business in downtown Wilmington, they also transformed the city’s black political culture. Moore’s Saloon opened in a perfect central location to Wilmington’s diverse black neighborhoods and quickly became a geographical hub of black politics. While Wilmington had a history of political organizing, even before emancipation, politics were traditionally centered in neighborhood churches. And while the saloon did not replace the church as the center of politics, it constructed the space for a different type of political dialogue. Furthermore, while there was much cross over, with many of the same people attending both church and saloon political meetings, the saloon included people that the church did not and visa versa. The saloon, a political space made possible through the implementation of Reconstruction law, was a crucial factor in Wilmington’s black political success.


Similar Titles:
Equal Rights and Common Law Legal Culture in Reconstruction North Carolina

Old South Political Culture in Contemporary North Carolina

Defining Citizen/Defining Statesman: From the Reconstruction Acts to the Election of Black Men in Wilmington, North Carolina

Soldiering, Citizenship, and Partisanship: Black Military Service and Postwar Political Participation in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1865-1877


 
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