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South African Americans: SNCC, Atlanta Apartheid, and the Development of the United Nations' Race Convention

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Abstract:

H. Timothy Lovelace, Jr., University of Virginia, htl5x@virginia.edu

“South African Americans: SNCC, Atlanta Apartheid, and the Development
of the United Nations’ Race Convention”


My essay will explore how civil rights activists in Atlanta, Georgia informed the development of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD). In January 1964, a sub-commission from the United Nations tasked with drafting ICERD decided to visit Atlanta, the American city deemed “too busy to hate,” to observe “how a democratic nation wrestles with its problems.” After learning about the United Nations’ visit to Atlanta, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) organized a weekend of protests to challenge the idea that Atlanta was “too busy to hate,” and the turbulent weekend fueled a major debate within the sub-commission. In my essay, I assert that SNCC’s blossoming militancy challenged the UN sub-commission’s understandings of American racial exceptionalism and helped to radically reframe the Articles 3 and 4 of ICERD. I maintain that SNCC’s activism compels historians to reconceptualize the process of international legal change and reconsider the global implications of civil rights activism in the US South.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436479_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lovelace, H. Timothy. "South African Americans: SNCC, Atlanta Apartheid, and the Development of the United Nations' Race Convention" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436479_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lovelace, H. "South African Americans: SNCC, Atlanta Apartheid, and the Development of the United Nations' Race Convention" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436479_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: H. Timothy Lovelace, Jr., University of Virginia, htl5x@virginia.edu

“South African Americans: SNCC, Atlanta Apartheid, and the Development
of the United Nations’ Race Convention”


My essay will explore how civil rights activists in Atlanta, Georgia informed the development of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD). In January 1964, a sub-commission from the United Nations tasked with drafting ICERD decided to visit Atlanta, the American city deemed “too busy to hate,” to observe “how a democratic nation wrestles with its problems.” After learning about the United Nations’ visit to Atlanta, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) organized a weekend of protests to challenge the idea that Atlanta was “too busy to hate,” and the turbulent weekend fueled a major debate within the sub-commission. In my essay, I assert that SNCC’s blossoming militancy challenged the UN sub-commission’s understandings of American racial exceptionalism and helped to radically reframe the Articles 3 and 4 of ICERD. I maintain that SNCC’s activism compels historians to reconceptualize the process of international legal change and reconsider the global implications of civil rights activism in the US South.


Similar Titles:
"Let whitey run his own Olympics": African American Pan-Africanism and the International Anti-apartheid Movement to expel South Africa from the 1968 Olympics

You Don’t See Race—Really?: Color-Blind Racism and Identity Development among African Americans.

A Quantitative Comparison of Major Democratic National Convention Speeches by High-Profile African American Political Leaders: How Is Race Treated?


 
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