Citation

The Urban League of Lincoln, Nebraska

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Abstract:

The Urban League of Lincoln:

A home on the land

Tekla Ali Johnson, Ph.D.

Abstract

For almost a century the African American community of Lincoln was centered in a neighborhood between Vine and R Streets, (South and North) and between 27th and 17th Streets (east and west); with a smaller number of Blacks surrounding Quinn Chapel AME Church on 9th and B Streets. Confined geographically by real-estate covenants, community members invested themselves in making the community a congenial and supportive place to live. Though segregated, the community had its own array of businesses, in the basements and backrooms of homes, a grocery store, a cab service, a dance hall and sandwich shop for teenagers, and by the late 1930’s, a local branch of the National Urban League.

The Urban League of Lincoln became the center of community life for residents serving as a buffer from segregation and discriminatory practices that were customary in Lincoln until the 1970s. The Urban League provided support as residents dealt with rebuke from the larger population through political activism, negotiation, and by creating their own world inside of the geographical limits of the neighborhood. Social, athletic, literary, and artistic club participation was high at the League and most prominent community men and women were active at both the “center’ and were also members of the Masonic lodge. This paper explores the forming of an array of interlocking social networks under segregation, which strengthened Lincoln, Nebraska’s largest African American neighborhood into an unusually cohesive group-- one that was able to deal strategically with the majority population which bounded the neighborhood on all sides, even as they fought an ongoing battle with the city and the university over their right to put down roots and develop and sustain wealth by owning pieces of the land.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436492_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Johnson, Tekla. "The Urban League of Lincoln, Nebraska" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436492_index.html>

APA Citation:

Johnson, T. A. , 2010-09-29 "The Urban League of Lincoln, Nebraska" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436492_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Urban League of Lincoln:

A home on the land

Tekla Ali Johnson, Ph.D.

Abstract

For almost a century the African American community of Lincoln was centered in a neighborhood between Vine and R Streets, (South and North) and between 27th and 17th Streets (east and west); with a smaller number of Blacks surrounding Quinn Chapel AME Church on 9th and B Streets. Confined geographically by real-estate covenants, community members invested themselves in making the community a congenial and supportive place to live. Though segregated, the community had its own array of businesses, in the basements and backrooms of homes, a grocery store, a cab service, a dance hall and sandwich shop for teenagers, and by the late 1930’s, a local branch of the National Urban League.

The Urban League of Lincoln became the center of community life for residents serving as a buffer from segregation and discriminatory practices that were customary in Lincoln until the 1970s. The Urban League provided support as residents dealt with rebuke from the larger population through political activism, negotiation, and by creating their own world inside of the geographical limits of the neighborhood. Social, athletic, literary, and artistic club participation was high at the League and most prominent community men and women were active at both the “center’ and were also members of the Masonic lodge. This paper explores the forming of an array of interlocking social networks under segregation, which strengthened Lincoln, Nebraska’s largest African American neighborhood into an unusually cohesive group-- one that was able to deal strategically with the majority population which bounded the neighborhood on all sides, even as they fought an ongoing battle with the city and the university over their right to put down roots and develop and sustain wealth by owning pieces of the land.


Similar Titles:
The National Urban League's Role in Developing Disparate Impact Doctrine in Employment Anti-Discrimination Law, 1910-1945

Civil Rights and the Party of Lincoln in the Urban North

"It isn't ice cream and cake. . .it must be something in them that is deeper": The St. Louis Urban League's Neighborhood Club and Block Unit Movement

John C. Dancy and the Detroit Urban League

"In No Way Associated with Persons of Strong Character": John W. Hamilton, the National Urban League and the Politics of Sexual Indecency


 
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