Citation

Black Beautification: African American Neighborhood Improvements in St. Louis, Missouri, 1927-1945

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Abstract:

Housing became a volatile issue in the early decades of the twentieth century. Restricting or limiting the use of land through zoning ordinances provided city planners with a tool to control the development and settlement of urban areas. For residents wishing to maintain racial unity, city ordinances became a way to control the natural integration of neighborhoods. Segregation ordinances provided an outlet for white conservatives to limit racial integration. Although the US Supreme Court declared these ordinances unconstitutional, property owners and neighborhood improvement associations began enforcement of racially restrictive covenants that prevented the transfer of property from whites to non-whites.
Examining the African American community in St. Louis during the 1930s, my paper will illustrate the use of property as agency that contributed to the filing of the racially restrictive case, Shelley v Kraemer. I argue that African Americans actively sought equality using property as a tool for beautification and recreation to thwart attempts of segregation by white conservatives. To support my argument I focus on community activism established by the Federation of Block Units, an organization under the direction of the Urban League of St. Louis. My examination will provide a better understanding of grassroots activism that became a model for national civil rights campaigns in the 1960s while contributing to the urban history and African American scholarship of the interwar period.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436564_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Ward, Donna. "Black Beautification: African American Neighborhood Improvements in St. Louis, Missouri, 1927-1945" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436564_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ward, D. P. , 2010-09-29 "Black Beautification: African American Neighborhood Improvements in St. Louis, Missouri, 1927-1945" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436564_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Housing became a volatile issue in the early decades of the twentieth century. Restricting or limiting the use of land through zoning ordinances provided city planners with a tool to control the development and settlement of urban areas. For residents wishing to maintain racial unity, city ordinances became a way to control the natural integration of neighborhoods. Segregation ordinances provided an outlet for white conservatives to limit racial integration. Although the US Supreme Court declared these ordinances unconstitutional, property owners and neighborhood improvement associations began enforcement of racially restrictive covenants that prevented the transfer of property from whites to non-whites.
Examining the African American community in St. Louis during the 1930s, my paper will illustrate the use of property as agency that contributed to the filing of the racially restrictive case, Shelley v Kraemer. I argue that African Americans actively sought equality using property as a tool for beautification and recreation to thwart attempts of segregation by white conservatives. To support my argument I focus on community activism established by the Federation of Block Units, an organization under the direction of the Urban League of St. Louis. My examination will provide a better understanding of grassroots activism that became a model for national civil rights campaigns in the 1960s while contributing to the urban history and African American scholarship of the interwar period.


Similar Titles:
Pioneers in Community Development: African American Banks in St. Louis, Missouri

African American Women, Black Testimony and Military Justice in Civil War St. Louis

Reading “Black Power” in the African American Neighborhood Museum Movement


 
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