Citation

Mass Perceptions of Media Bias in the 2008 Presidential Election: Gender Bias, Racial Bias, or Fair Game?

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Abstract:

Much has been discussed about the role of race and gender in the 2008 presidential primaries and general election. Pundits seemed more attuned to the role that race and gender might play in the level of support that either Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama might receive as candidates associated with two underrepresented groups (gender group and racial group, respectively) as viable candidates in the presidential election. Media have an important role in framing political issues and coverage of elections and shaping the images of political candidates. Of special interest is how the American public views the role of media in shaping the imagery of candidates through their coverage. In particular, did the American public perceive that Clinton or Obama were treated differently or similarly by the media because of their status as members of underrepresented groups in American politics? This paper uses data from the national survey, 2008 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, to explore mass perceptions of racial and gender bias in the 2008 presidential election coverage of the Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama presidential candidacies. The paper seeks to identify determinants of racial and gender bias in media coverage, with implications for the perceptions of the role of gender and race in the depiction of presidential candidates.
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Association:
Name: Northeastern Political Science Association
URL:
http://www.northeasternpsa.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439413_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Nunnally, Shayla. "Mass Perceptions of Media Bias in the 2008 Presidential Election: Gender Bias, Racial Bias, or Fair Game?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439413_index.html>

APA Citation:

Nunnally, S. C. , 2010-11-11 "Mass Perceptions of Media Bias in the 2008 Presidential Election: Gender Bias, Racial Bias, or Fair Game?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439413_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Much has been discussed about the role of race and gender in the 2008 presidential primaries and general election. Pundits seemed more attuned to the role that race and gender might play in the level of support that either Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama might receive as candidates associated with two underrepresented groups (gender group and racial group, respectively) as viable candidates in the presidential election. Media have an important role in framing political issues and coverage of elections and shaping the images of political candidates. Of special interest is how the American public views the role of media in shaping the imagery of candidates through their coverage. In particular, did the American public perceive that Clinton or Obama were treated differently or similarly by the media because of their status as members of underrepresented groups in American politics? This paper uses data from the national survey, 2008 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, to explore mass perceptions of racial and gender bias in the 2008 presidential election coverage of the Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama presidential candidacies. The paper seeks to identify determinants of racial and gender bias in media coverage, with implications for the perceptions of the role of gender and race in the depiction of presidential candidates.


Similar Titles:
The Shoe that Didn't Drop: Bias and Racial Priming in the 2008 Presidential Election

You Say Pink, I Say Red: Selective Perception and Biased Information Processing in the 2008 Presidential Election

Making the Mass Media Work for You: How campaigns utilized mass media theories to promote themselves, woo undecided voters and attack opponents during the 2008 presidential primaries and election


 
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