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Patterns of child care for Australian infants and two-year-olds. Relationships and daily transitions

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Abstract:

This paper will present data from the infant cohort of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Patterns of child care attendance were collected on 5000 6 to 12 month old children (Wave 1) and two years later at age 2½ to 3 (Wave 2). The focus of the paper is on the children’s experiences of care, as described by aspects of their daily transitions and the quality of the relationships they form with their child care caregiver. The position taken by the Australian Government, through the Early Years Learning Framework, and accepted by educators and child care providers, is that child care should be emotionally supportive and foster secure attachments. This is backed up by international research showing that children’s attachments to caregivers and their sense of well-being are enhanced by care contexts that are more stable. Some authors have suggested that stability is more likely in home-based rather than centre-based settings. This proposal will be examined by an investigation of the LSAC data set at Waves 1 and 2. At each Wave, the child’s primary child care caregiver was asked to complete the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (Pianta, 2001). At Wave 2, children’s response to transition (daily arrivals and departures) was assessed by caregiver ratings; eg., ‘when this child arrives he/she greets you enthusiastically’; ‘while the parent is leaving, this child seems angry or sad’. Analyses will compare relationship closeness and conflict for different patterns of infant and two-year-old child care (home-based, centre-based, mix of home and centre). Longitudinal analyses will consider the role of relationship quality as a possible predictor of children’s transition behavior. Discussion will be invited on the different childhoods experienced by children under three attending child care.
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Association:
Name: Children and Childhoods Research Symposium
URL:
http://www.iec.mq.edu.au


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439622_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Harrison, Linda. "Patterns of child care for Australian infants and two-year-olds. Relationships and daily transitions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Children and Childhoods Research Symposium, Institute of Early Childhood, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, Sep 24, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439622_index.html>

APA Citation:

Harrison, L. , 2010-09-24 "Patterns of child care for Australian infants and two-year-olds. Relationships and daily transitions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Children and Childhoods Research Symposium, Institute of Early Childhood, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439622_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will present data from the infant cohort of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Patterns of child care attendance were collected on 5000 6 to 12 month old children (Wave 1) and two years later at age 2½ to 3 (Wave 2). The focus of the paper is on the children’s experiences of care, as described by aspects of their daily transitions and the quality of the relationships they form with their child care caregiver. The position taken by the Australian Government, through the Early Years Learning Framework, and accepted by educators and child care providers, is that child care should be emotionally supportive and foster secure attachments. This is backed up by international research showing that children’s attachments to caregivers and their sense of well-being are enhanced by care contexts that are more stable. Some authors have suggested that stability is more likely in home-based rather than centre-based settings. This proposal will be examined by an investigation of the LSAC data set at Waves 1 and 2. At each Wave, the child’s primary child care caregiver was asked to complete the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (Pianta, 2001). At Wave 2, children’s response to transition (daily arrivals and departures) was assessed by caregiver ratings; eg., ‘when this child arrives he/she greets you enthusiastically’; ‘while the parent is leaving, this child seems angry or sad’. Analyses will compare relationship closeness and conflict for different patterns of infant and two-year-old child care (home-based, centre-based, mix of home and centre). Longitudinal analyses will consider the role of relationship quality as a possible predictor of children’s transition behavior. Discussion will be invited on the different childhoods experienced by children under three attending child care.


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