Citation

Advocacy and Power: Early Childhood Educators' Perceptions

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Abstract:

A surfeit of early childhood literature has affirmed the importance and need for advocacy and power in raising the professional status of early childhood educators (Bown, 2009; Duncan, 1996; Ebbeck & Waniganayake, 2003; Hayden, 1997b; Rodd, 1997; Sachs, 2000, 2001). Nevertheless, there has been a scarcity of empirical research investigating educators’ perceptions of advocacy and power with multiple stakeholders in diverse contexts. Therefore, the study utilised a phenomenological design to investigate the perceptions of twelve early childhood educators currently working full-time in childcare settings across Sydney, New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Four directors, four degree trained early childhood teachers and four diploma trained early childhood teachers participated in the current study. Two in-depth semi-structured interviews, artefacts and mosaics were collected from each participant and analysed utilising QSR NVivo Version 8. Findings revealed that participants were ambivalent towards power as they perceived themselves to be influential within the internal setting yet perceived raising the professional status to be the responsibility of senior stakeholders in wider socio-political contexts. The study inferred that participants’ self-perceptions, role identifications and definitions impacted on their practices and perceptions of power and advocacy. Recommendations for future practice involve educators collectively utilising power to advocate for the professional status through proactive advocacies.
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Association:
Name: Children and Childhoods Research Symposium
URL:
http://www.iec.mq.edu.au


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p445906_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Mevawalla, Zinnia. "Advocacy and Power: Early Childhood Educators' Perceptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Children and Childhoods Research Symposium, Institute of Early Childhood, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, Sep 24, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p445906_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mevawalla, Z. , 2010-09-24 "Advocacy and Power: Early Childhood Educators' Perceptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Children and Childhoods Research Symposium, Institute of Early Childhood, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p445906_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A surfeit of early childhood literature has affirmed the importance and need for advocacy and power in raising the professional status of early childhood educators (Bown, 2009; Duncan, 1996; Ebbeck & Waniganayake, 2003; Hayden, 1997b; Rodd, 1997; Sachs, 2000, 2001). Nevertheless, there has been a scarcity of empirical research investigating educators’ perceptions of advocacy and power with multiple stakeholders in diverse contexts. Therefore, the study utilised a phenomenological design to investigate the perceptions of twelve early childhood educators currently working full-time in childcare settings across Sydney, New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Four directors, four degree trained early childhood teachers and four diploma trained early childhood teachers participated in the current study. Two in-depth semi-structured interviews, artefacts and mosaics were collected from each participant and analysed utilising QSR NVivo Version 8. Findings revealed that participants were ambivalent towards power as they perceived themselves to be influential within the internal setting yet perceived raising the professional status to be the responsibility of senior stakeholders in wider socio-political contexts. The study inferred that participants’ self-perceptions, role identifications and definitions impacted on their practices and perceptions of power and advocacy. Recommendations for future practice involve educators collectively utilising power to advocate for the professional status through proactive advocacies.


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