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Alibi evidence: When do mock jurors find alibis hard to believe?

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Abstract:

The impact of the alibi salaciousness, the presence of physical evidence, and the type of crime on jurors’ ratings of believability and guilt were examined. Undergraduates (N = 317) read a fabricated police narrative. The results revealed that alibis substantiated by physical evidence led to fewer guilty verdicts, higher alibi believability, and more positive character ratings. Although salaciousness did not affect trial outcomes and believability, salacious alibis did lead to fewer positive character ratings when physical evidence was present. Defendants who committed sexual offences (vs. physical assault or theft) were more likely to receive guilty verdicts and longer sentences.
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Association:
Name: American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law
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http://www.ap-ls.org/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482173_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Bohn, Linzy., Jung, Sandy. and Allison, Meredith. "Alibi evidence: When do mock jurors find alibis hard to believe?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, Mar 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482173_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bohn, L. , Jung, S. and Allison, M. , 2011-03-02 "Alibi evidence: When do mock jurors find alibis hard to believe?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482173_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The impact of the alibi salaciousness, the presence of physical evidence, and the type of crime on jurors’ ratings of believability and guilt were examined. Undergraduates (N = 317) read a fabricated police narrative. The results revealed that alibis substantiated by physical evidence led to fewer guilty verdicts, higher alibi believability, and more positive character ratings. Although salaciousness did not affect trial outcomes and believability, salacious alibis did lead to fewer positive character ratings when physical evidence was present. Defendants who committed sexual offences (vs. physical assault or theft) were more likely to receive guilty verdicts and longer sentences.


Similar Titles:
When (Truthful) Alibi Evidence is Overlooked in Favour of (False) Eyewitness Evidence: Findings from the Innocence Project Case Files

Believe me…Believe me not: Investigating the possibility of a dual standard in the evaluation of alibi and eyewitness evidence

An Examination of How Expectancies Towards Science and Trial Evidence Impact Mock Jurors' Use of Complex Scientific Evidence


 
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