Citation

Measuring defendants’ perceptions of courts: A field study of trust, confidence, and procedural justice

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Abstract:

We surveyed 452 misdemeanor defendants who either appeared or failed to appear for their court hearing. Defendants who appeared in court had higher levels of public trust and confidence, and greater perceptions of procedural justice, than defendants who failed to appear. There was some evidence that reminders were more effective for defendants who were relatively low in public trust and confidence than for defendants who were relatively high in trust/confidence. We also found significant relationships between procedural justice assessments and trust/confidence attitudes. The implications of our research include the suggestion to reduce failure to appear in courts by finding ways by increasing peoples’ perceptions of public trust and confidence. Specific targets for increasing trust and confidence in the courts are racial and ethnic minorities – these groups have the greatest potential benefit among groups that already have high failure-to-appear rates and low public trust and confidence. In addition, our findings reflect the importance of the specification and measurement of the trust/confidence construct.
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Association:
Name: American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law
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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482896_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Bornstein, Brian., Hamm, Joseph., Herian, Mitchel. and Tomkins, Alan. "Measuring defendants’ perceptions of courts: A field study of trust, confidence, and procedural justice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482896_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bornstein, B. , Hamm, J. , Herian, M. N. and Tomkins, A. "Measuring defendants’ perceptions of courts: A field study of trust, confidence, and procedural justice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482896_index.html

Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: We surveyed 452 misdemeanor defendants who either appeared or failed to appear for their court hearing. Defendants who appeared in court had higher levels of public trust and confidence, and greater perceptions of procedural justice, than defendants who failed to appear. There was some evidence that reminders were more effective for defendants who were relatively low in public trust and confidence than for defendants who were relatively high in trust/confidence. We also found significant relationships between procedural justice assessments and trust/confidence attitudes. The implications of our research include the suggestion to reduce failure to appear in courts by finding ways by increasing peoples’ perceptions of public trust and confidence. Specific targets for increasing trust and confidence in the courts are racial and ethnic minorities – these groups have the greatest potential benefit among groups that already have high failure-to-appear rates and low public trust and confidence. In addition, our findings reflect the importance of the specification and measurement of the trust/confidence construct.


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An exploratory study of the impact of perceptions of procedural justice in a drug court setting.

From procedural justice to trust in institutional authorities: an European comparison of perceptions about Police and Courts

A Field Study of Procedural Justice and Confidence/Trust in the Courts: A Survey of Misdemeanants


 
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