Citation

Saying It with Conviction… and Acquittal: The Effects of TV Crime Drama Exposure on Jurors’ Self-Efficacy and Verdict Confidence

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Past research demonstrates that media consumers learn “facts” from fiction. Depending upon the nature of the facts that are learned, consumers may be affected by their new “knowledge” in a variety of important ways. This study explored the possibility that future jurors might learn enough “science” from TV crime dramas to become especially confident in their pre-trial ability to evaluate forensic evidence presented during a murder trial. We refer to this possibility of a gain in confidence as a particular type of self-efficacy that could manifest itself in jury deliberation and decision-making. The study also tested the association between consumption of TV crime drama and the certainty of a verdict rendered after reading about the details of a murder case. Over 530 undergraduate students completed a Web-based survey in which they answered questions about their self-confidence in evaluating forensic evidence at a murder trial and their habits concerning consumption of TV in general—and, specifically, crime-oriented TV fiction (COTV). They also read the details of a murder case and rendered their verdict along with reports of the level of confidence in that verdict. Frequent crime-drama viewers had significantly higher levels of confidence in their ability to evaluate forensic evidence (self-efficacy) than did non-viewers. There was also a significant relationship between self-efficacy and verdict certainty. General TV consumption was unrelated to self-efficacy suggesting the possibility of specific influence from fictional crime drama. Given these results, future studies that examine the possible influence of fictional crime dramas on jury members seem warranted.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

confid (59), self (54), verdict (51), juror (51), efficaci (40), view (40), evid (38), trial (35), self-efficaci (35), variabl (33), convict (31), tv (31), crime (29), one (29), cotv (27), acquitt (27), p (26), effect (26), say (26), would (26), studi (22),
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: BEA
URL:
http://www.beaweb.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483415_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Sarapin, Susan. and Sparks, Glenn. "Saying It with Conviction… and Acquittal: The Effects of TV Crime Drama Exposure on Jurors’ Self-Efficacy and Verdict Confidence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 09, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483415_index.html>

APA Citation:

Sarapin, S. H. and Sparks, G. , 2011-04-09 "Saying It with Conviction… and Acquittal: The Effects of TV Crime Drama Exposure on Jurors’ Self-Efficacy and Verdict Confidence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483415_index.html

Publication Type: Open Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Past research demonstrates that media consumers learn “facts” from fiction. Depending upon the nature of the facts that are learned, consumers may be affected by their new “knowledge” in a variety of important ways. This study explored the possibility that future jurors might learn enough “science” from TV crime dramas to become especially confident in their pre-trial ability to evaluate forensic evidence presented during a murder trial. We refer to this possibility of a gain in confidence as a particular type of self-efficacy that could manifest itself in jury deliberation and decision-making. The study also tested the association between consumption of TV crime drama and the certainty of a verdict rendered after reading about the details of a murder case. Over 530 undergraduate students completed a Web-based survey in which they answered questions about their self-confidence in evaluating forensic evidence at a murder trial and their habits concerning consumption of TV in general—and, specifically, crime-oriented TV fiction (COTV). They also read the details of a murder case and rendered their verdict along with reports of the level of confidence in that verdict. Frequent crime-drama viewers had significantly higher levels of confidence in their ability to evaluate forensic evidence (self-efficacy) than did non-viewers. There was also a significant relationship between self-efficacy and verdict certainty. General TV consumption was unrelated to self-efficacy suggesting the possibility of specific influence from fictional crime drama. Given these results, future studies that examine the possible influence of fictional crime dramas on jury members seem warranted.


Similar Titles:
The effects of judge versus attorney cross-examination of experts on juror evaluations of evidence quality

Evaluating the Role of Social Support and Self-efficacy in an Intergenerational Educational Intervention: A Case Study Approach

The effect of neuroscientific deception detection evidence on juror judgments in a criminal trial

The Viewing of TV Crime Drama and the 'CSI Effect': There’s a Verdict Hanging in the Balance

Bayesian Inference, Program Evaluation, and the Accumulation of Evidence in Crime and Justice Intervention Studies


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.