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Pathways to higher education for refugee and undocumented populations in Jordan and the United States

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Abstract:

The proposed paper will explore educational realities for Palestinian refugees in Jordan and juxtaposing those realities with undocumented students in the United States. First, the study aims to unearth academic inequity for Palestinian refugee university graduates. A critical ethnography approach aims to understand the role of refugee-status and disenfranchisement in academia, thereby highlighting the institutionalization of oppression and privilege. No region in the world harbors as many refugees as the Middle East (US Committee for Refugees-World Refugee Survey, 2005). Palestinians are a very significant group for two reasons; first, Palestinians are the largest single group of refugees, and second, the majority of Palestinians are refugees (American Friends Service Committee, 2004). As of 2003, there are seven million worldwide (Badil Resource Center, 2006). This staggering number means that approximately two thirds of the Palestinian people are refugees (Middle East Report 22, 2004). As of March 31, 2005, Jordan harbors 1,780,701 registered Palestinian refugees, more than any other country (UNRWA, 2005). The total number of Palestinian refugees in Jordan is 2,700,000; fifty percent of the area’s population (US Committee for Refugees, 2003). No country has extended as much effort, money, time and compassion to Palestinians as Jordan. Nonetheless, tensions still exists between native Jordanians and their Palestinian counterparts.
Second, the study will utilize a grounded theory methodology to track the history of undocumented immigrants pursuing American higher education, and identifying current trends of border crossing/migrant education in the United States. The research will not only record the journey of undocumented college students, but also examine the existing policies and programs that aid this student population in the pursuit of higher education. As immigration law remains at the forefront of U.S. politics, institutions of higher education have created programs (Olivas, 1994), lobbied local government (Passel, 2003), and reviewed policies that address undocumented students (Ruge & Iza, 2004). Although the perception remains that undocumented education is compartmentalized to a regional sector and ethnic community of the United States, the study proposes that the resolution of policies regarding immigration will have a wide and varying impact on all facets of U.S. society.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483701_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Washington, Brad. and Marar-Yacobian, Marianne. "Pathways to higher education for refugee and undocumented populations in Jordan and the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483701_index.html>

APA Citation:

Washington, B. D. and Marar-Yacobian, M. , 2011-04-30 "Pathways to higher education for refugee and undocumented populations in Jordan and the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483701_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The proposed paper will explore educational realities for Palestinian refugees in Jordan and juxtaposing those realities with undocumented students in the United States. First, the study aims to unearth academic inequity for Palestinian refugee university graduates. A critical ethnography approach aims to understand the role of refugee-status and disenfranchisement in academia, thereby highlighting the institutionalization of oppression and privilege. No region in the world harbors as many refugees as the Middle East (US Committee for Refugees-World Refugee Survey, 2005). Palestinians are a very significant group for two reasons; first, Palestinians are the largest single group of refugees, and second, the majority of Palestinians are refugees (American Friends Service Committee, 2004). As of 2003, there are seven million worldwide (Badil Resource Center, 2006). This staggering number means that approximately two thirds of the Palestinian people are refugees (Middle East Report 22, 2004). As of March 31, 2005, Jordan harbors 1,780,701 registered Palestinian refugees, more than any other country (UNRWA, 2005). The total number of Palestinian refugees in Jordan is 2,700,000; fifty percent of the area’s population (US Committee for Refugees, 2003). No country has extended as much effort, money, time and compassion to Palestinians as Jordan. Nonetheless, tensions still exists between native Jordanians and their Palestinian counterparts.
Second, the study will utilize a grounded theory methodology to track the history of undocumented immigrants pursuing American higher education, and identifying current trends of border crossing/migrant education in the United States. The research will not only record the journey of undocumented college students, but also examine the existing policies and programs that aid this student population in the pursuit of higher education. As immigration law remains at the forefront of U.S. politics, institutions of higher education have created programs (Olivas, 1994), lobbied local government (Passel, 2003), and reviewed policies that address undocumented students (Ruge & Iza, 2004). Although the perception remains that undocumented education is compartmentalized to a regional sector and ethnic community of the United States, the study proposes that the resolution of policies regarding immigration will have a wide and varying impact on all facets of U.S. society.


Similar Titles:
United States Higher Education Under Attack

The Politics of Higher Education Policy Making for Undocumented Immigrants in the States, 1998-2005

A comparative study of international student mobility in higher education: Challenges and opportunities for the United States, Australia, and China

Access and Equality of Educational Opportunity in Higher Education in France and the United States


 
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