Citation

The First Black President? Cross-racial Perceptions of Barack Obama’s Race

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

African Americans have questioned Barack Obama’s racial authenticity (“Is he Black enough?”); and, among many whites, he is seen as something other than truly “black” – a fact that made him more palatable to whites as a candidate and likely contributed to his electoral success. These issues point to the importance of understanding how and why people view Barack Obama as occupying one or another racial status/category in America. This paper explores these issues through 2009 survey data from the Pew Research Center’s “Racial Attitudes in America II” project (N = 2,850). Our analyses center on whether Obama is seen as “black” or “mixed race.” Specifically, we explore how a host of factors -- including demographics, concerns about Obama’s political focus on Whites and Blacks, perceptions of discrimination, perceptions of the nature of Obama’s values, racial stereotypes, and respondents’ own racial identities (including a “mixed race” option) -- shape how the public views the President in terms of race. In so doing, we hope to shed light on the ways in which persons’ social locations, identities, and views on racial and societal issues contribute to how Obama’s racial status is constructed by the lay public.

Author's Keywords:

Barack Obama, Public Opinion, Racial Identity, American Politics
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: NCOBPS 42nd Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.ncobps.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484584_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Wilson, David. "The First Black President? Cross-racial Perceptions of Barack Obama’s Race" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCOBPS 42nd Annual Meeting, Raleigh, North Carolina, Hilton-North Raleigh, Wake Forest Road, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484584_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wilson, D. , 2011-03-16 "The First Black President? Cross-racial Perceptions of Barack Obama’s Race" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCOBPS 42nd Annual Meeting, Raleigh, North Carolina, Hilton-North Raleigh, Wake Forest Road <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484584_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: African Americans have questioned Barack Obama’s racial authenticity (“Is he Black enough?”); and, among many whites, he is seen as something other than truly “black” – a fact that made him more palatable to whites as a candidate and likely contributed to his electoral success. These issues point to the importance of understanding how and why people view Barack Obama as occupying one or another racial status/category in America. This paper explores these issues through 2009 survey data from the Pew Research Center’s “Racial Attitudes in America II” project (N = 2,850). Our analyses center on whether Obama is seen as “black” or “mixed race.” Specifically, we explore how a host of factors -- including demographics, concerns about Obama’s political focus on Whites and Blacks, perceptions of discrimination, perceptions of the nature of Obama’s values, racial stereotypes, and respondents’ own racial identities (including a “mixed race” option) -- shape how the public views the President in terms of race. In so doing, we hope to shed light on the ways in which persons’ social locations, identities, and views on racial and societal issues contribute to how Obama’s racial status is constructed by the lay public.


Similar Titles:
Obama as the First Black US President: Voter Perceptions of Race

Retrospection on Racial Group Interests: Black President or Black Interests, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.