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Continuity and change in the Greek history textbook: Comparing Greek history textbooks from 1834-1880

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Abstract:

Topic: Continuity and Change in the Greek History Textbook: Comparing Greek History Textbooks from 1834-1880.

Abstract

Overview: This paper discusses the intricate process by which Greek textbooks were manufactured and then studied by the Greek student. One will find that a Greek history was initially imported from abroad. These first Greek histories were translated into Greek and then taught in the Greek schools. Few of these textbooks included histories of modern Greece and were almost exclusively on ancient Greece.

Theoretical/conceptual framework: It is fair to say that curriculum is central in schools and that knowledge is imparted via school textbooks. Michael Apple, Linda-Christian Smith, Paulo Friere, and Henry A. Giroux are among those who have powerfully argued that the textbook is essentially a vehicle that achieves particular political, cultural, and social end. The proposed paper provides examples of textbooks from around the world and discusses how the past is taught may vary from nation to nation, but all seek to unite their people around a shared historical past. Textbooks are often windows to understanding the world from a particular society’s viewpoint, as well as how the society sees itself, and how it wants to be seen by others. Through the textbook the student may become politically and culturally indoctrinated and form in his or her consciousness a sense of a national identity. The way history is written and the way it is taught in schools thus plays a significant role in the shaping of a national identity.

Methodology and Findings: Four history textbooks from 1834-1880 are examined. These include: William Mitford’s Ancient Greek History for use in Schools (1836), Oliver Goldsmith’s History of Greece (1849), J.R. Lamè-Fleury’s Greek History for Children (1860), and Thomas Keightly’s History of Ancient Greece for Use in Schools (1850). The texts were intended for students in Europe, but were later translated and popularly used in the Greek schools. One will find that the texts were chosen in Greece because they revered the ancient Greek past and glorified the figures and events of that past. At the same time, Greek translators found that this past could be easily tied to a Modern Greek identity.
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Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p485492_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Zervas, Theodore. "Continuity and change in the Greek history textbook: Comparing Greek history textbooks from 1834-1880" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p485492_index.html>

APA Citation:

Zervas, T. G. , 2011-05-01 "Continuity and change in the Greek history textbook: Comparing Greek history textbooks from 1834-1880" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p485492_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Topic: Continuity and Change in the Greek History Textbook: Comparing Greek History Textbooks from 1834-1880.

Abstract

Overview: This paper discusses the intricate process by which Greek textbooks were manufactured and then studied by the Greek student. One will find that a Greek history was initially imported from abroad. These first Greek histories were translated into Greek and then taught in the Greek schools. Few of these textbooks included histories of modern Greece and were almost exclusively on ancient Greece.

Theoretical/conceptual framework: It is fair to say that curriculum is central in schools and that knowledge is imparted via school textbooks. Michael Apple, Linda-Christian Smith, Paulo Friere, and Henry A. Giroux are among those who have powerfully argued that the textbook is essentially a vehicle that achieves particular political, cultural, and social end. The proposed paper provides examples of textbooks from around the world and discusses how the past is taught may vary from nation to nation, but all seek to unite their people around a shared historical past. Textbooks are often windows to understanding the world from a particular society’s viewpoint, as well as how the society sees itself, and how it wants to be seen by others. Through the textbook the student may become politically and culturally indoctrinated and form in his or her consciousness a sense of a national identity. The way history is written and the way it is taught in schools thus plays a significant role in the shaping of a national identity.

Methodology and Findings: Four history textbooks from 1834-1880 are examined. These include: William Mitford’s Ancient Greek History for use in Schools (1836), Oliver Goldsmith’s History of Greece (1849), J.R. Lamè-Fleury’s Greek History for Children (1860), and Thomas Keightly’s History of Ancient Greece for Use in Schools (1850). The texts were intended for students in Europe, but were later translated and popularly used in the Greek schools. One will find that the texts were chosen in Greece because they revered the ancient Greek past and glorified the figures and events of that past. At the same time, Greek translators found that this past could be easily tied to a Modern Greek identity.


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National identity and the politics of the Greek history textbook in the early modern Greek school.


 
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