Citation

Culturally responsive education through arts integration: How do students see it?

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

“African culture is cool, better than our ghetto culture!” observes an African-American elementary school student. Some peers express more ambivalence. Students in three inner-city public elementary schools in the US participate in a Culturally Responsive Arts Education Project (CRAE). The goal is to integrate African and African Diaspora art across the curriculum. African-American children, especially those attending under-funded inner-city schools, remain disenfranchised. The expectations are that the project will raise student engagement in school, strengthen a positive identity among the largely African-American student body and contribute to closing the achievement gap (Hanley & Noblit, 2009). Local artists teach their respective disciplines and collaborate with classroom teachers in integrating the arts in the standard curriculum. An evaluation study seeks to identify the effect on students’ identity formation and changes in behavior and engagement, among other issues. The evaluation seeks to be culturally responsive by taking the context into account. The paper will describe the goals and structure of the project and present preliminary results of the ongoing, three-year study. Classroom observations and conversational interviews with school staff, parents and students, along with evaluation of student work, examine the issue of identity formation. How does students’ self image change with increased exposure to their ancestral art forms? Will greater knowledge about African countries and art forms, along with knowledge of the African Diaspora and its ensuing art, strengthen their engagement and learning? Will student practice of the art forms serve as a source of encouragement? Some findings to these questions will be presented and discussed.

Stone Hanley, M., Noblit, G. W. (2009). Cultural responsiveness, racial identity and academic success: a review of literature. A paper prepared for The Heinz Endowments
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486199_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Stokes, Helga., Hopson, Rodney K.., Generett, Gretchen., Bantum, Kaleigh. and Good, Tyra. "Culturally responsive education through arts integration: How do students see it?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486199_index.html>

APA Citation:

Stokes, H. , Hopson, R. , Generett, G. , Bantum, K. and Good, T. , 2011-04-30 "Culturally responsive education through arts integration: How do students see it?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486199_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: “African culture is cool, better than our ghetto culture!” observes an African-American elementary school student. Some peers express more ambivalence. Students in three inner-city public elementary schools in the US participate in a Culturally Responsive Arts Education Project (CRAE). The goal is to integrate African and African Diaspora art across the curriculum. African-American children, especially those attending under-funded inner-city schools, remain disenfranchised. The expectations are that the project will raise student engagement in school, strengthen a positive identity among the largely African-American student body and contribute to closing the achievement gap (Hanley & Noblit, 2009). Local artists teach their respective disciplines and collaborate with classroom teachers in integrating the arts in the standard curriculum. An evaluation study seeks to identify the effect on students’ identity formation and changes in behavior and engagement, among other issues. The evaluation seeks to be culturally responsive by taking the context into account. The paper will describe the goals and structure of the project and present preliminary results of the ongoing, three-year study. Classroom observations and conversational interviews with school staff, parents and students, along with evaluation of student work, examine the issue of identity formation. How does students’ self image change with increased exposure to their ancestral art forms? Will greater knowledge about African countries and art forms, along with knowledge of the African Diaspora and its ensuing art, strengthen their engagement and learning? Will student practice of the art forms serve as a source of encouragement? Some findings to these questions will be presented and discussed.

Stone Hanley, M., Noblit, G. W. (2009). Cultural responsiveness, racial identity and academic success: a review of literature. A paper prepared for The Heinz Endowments


Similar Titles:
Teacher educators and diverse learners: Bridging the contemporary cultural disconnect to educate the whole student.

Confucius institutes: The new educational phenomena and their role in integrating Eastern and Western cultures and education

Integrating eastern and western education traditions into Chinese language and cultural education


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.