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Career paths of teacher training graduates in Oman

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Abstract:

Improving the quality of primary and secondary education is one of the highest priorities of virtually all countries in the Middle East. While countries throughout the region have experienced dramatic growth in primary and secondary enrollments in the last decade student achievement has tended to lag, compared to other regions of the world (World Bank 2008). A number of analyses point to the professional limitations of teachers as a principal reason for the low achievement. This has led to extensive efforts in many Middle Eastern countries to improve incentives and conditions of employment by upgrading teacher preparation programs, job characteristics, and professional benefits. One of the most interesting national efforts is in Oman. With oil supplies (and revenue) declining, Oman is committed to building a more knowledge-based economy. To that end, it has engaged in a series of education reform efforts, the success of which depends heavily on teachers. Education officials now seek a better understanding of teachers' perceptions of their work and careers. Grounded in Chapman and Hutcheson's (1982) model of teacher attrition, this study traced the career development of 625 graduates of the secondary school teacher training program offered at Sultan Qaboos University, the most prestigious (and only public) training program for secondary school teachers in Oman. The findings indicated that, while graduates were very positive about their pre-service preparation, a substantial proportion of teachers were unhappy in their current employment. Most felt they lacked viable career options. Significant gender differences in the responses suggest educational officials should also consider the effects of gender on teachers' career satisfaction. References Chapman, D.W. and Hutcheson, S.M. (1982). Attrition from teaching careers: A discriminant analysis. American Educational Research Journal, 19(1), 93-105. World Bank. (2008). The road not traveled: Education reform in the Middle East and North Africa. Washington DC: World Bank.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486419_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Greene, Elizabeth., Chapman, David. and Al-Barwani, Thuwayba. "Career paths of teacher training graduates in Oman" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486419_index.html>

APA Citation:

Greene, E. , Chapman, D. and Al-Barwani, T. , 2011-04-30 "Career paths of teacher training graduates in Oman" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486419_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Improving the quality of primary and secondary education is one of the highest priorities of virtually all countries in the Middle East. While countries throughout the region have experienced dramatic growth in primary and secondary enrollments in the last decade student achievement has tended to lag, compared to other regions of the world (World Bank 2008). A number of analyses point to the professional limitations of teachers as a principal reason for the low achievement. This has led to extensive efforts in many Middle Eastern countries to improve incentives and conditions of employment by upgrading teacher preparation programs, job characteristics, and professional benefits. One of the most interesting national efforts is in Oman. With oil supplies (and revenue) declining, Oman is committed to building a more knowledge-based economy. To that end, it has engaged in a series of education reform efforts, the success of which depends heavily on teachers. Education officials now seek a better understanding of teachers' perceptions of their work and careers. Grounded in Chapman and Hutcheson's (1982) model of teacher attrition, this study traced the career development of 625 graduates of the secondary school teacher training program offered at Sultan Qaboos University, the most prestigious (and only public) training program for secondary school teachers in Oman. The findings indicated that, while graduates were very positive about their pre-service preparation, a substantial proportion of teachers were unhappy in their current employment. Most felt they lacked viable career options. Significant gender differences in the responses suggest educational officials should also consider the effects of gender on teachers' career satisfaction. References Chapman, D.W. and Hutcheson, S.M. (1982). Attrition from teaching careers: A discriminant analysis. American Educational Research Journal, 19(1), 93-105. World Bank. (2008). The road not traveled: Education reform in the Middle East and North Africa. Washington DC: World Bank.


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