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Voices of four generations of African intellectuals and universities from the 1960s to the present: A cross-national comparison

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Abstract:

Since the 1960s, when newly independent African countries started to create universities as instruments of their national development agendas, there have been about three waves of higher education institutions and four generations of African scholars and students. The first generation of public universities appeared in the 1960s and 1970s and consisted of single-campus national universities with teaching and research in all the disciplines and fields of study. Amidst a severe economic crisis and stringent austerity policies of international financial institutions, a second set of mostly public universities were build in the 1980s and 1990s, most of which were specialized by disciplinary areas mainly in medicine, science, technology, and agriculture. The third and most recent series of institutions is mainly characterized by the emergence of private universities and the importance of the commercial motive. During these stages of institutional development and effort to actualize development agendas, there have been different generations of intellectuals (students, scholars, and other college-educated people) who have used their knowledge to participate in debates and actions. These members of the educational community have sought to impact policies and broader political processes in the national lives of their respective countries. Using a comparative approach, this ongoing study aims to document, critically examine, and analyze the trajectory of these generations of African university students and scholars and institutions of higher learning.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486458_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Assie-Lumumba, N'Dri. "Voices of four generations of African intellectuals and universities from the 1960s to the present: A cross-national comparison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486458_index.html>

APA Citation:

Assie-Lumumba, N. T. , 2011-04-30 "Voices of four generations of African intellectuals and universities from the 1960s to the present: A cross-national comparison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486458_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the 1960s, when newly independent African countries started to create universities as instruments of their national development agendas, there have been about three waves of higher education institutions and four generations of African scholars and students. The first generation of public universities appeared in the 1960s and 1970s and consisted of single-campus national universities with teaching and research in all the disciplines and fields of study. Amidst a severe economic crisis and stringent austerity policies of international financial institutions, a second set of mostly public universities were build in the 1980s and 1990s, most of which were specialized by disciplinary areas mainly in medicine, science, technology, and agriculture. The third and most recent series of institutions is mainly characterized by the emergence of private universities and the importance of the commercial motive. During these stages of institutional development and effort to actualize development agendas, there have been different generations of intellectuals (students, scholars, and other college-educated people) who have used their knowledge to participate in debates and actions. These members of the educational community have sought to impact policies and broader political processes in the national lives of their respective countries. Using a comparative approach, this ongoing study aims to document, critically examine, and analyze the trajectory of these generations of African university students and scholars and institutions of higher learning.


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