Citation

Learning, experiencing, and constructing citizenship in the "success" oriented society: U.S. youths’ perspectives

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

With the impact of globalization in various spheres of society, today’s youth are forming new forms of membership within multidimensional spheres of their experiences. Acknowledging the changes in the youths' life experiences, there is a growing argument within education for expanding the understanding of conceptualization of citizenship and its implication for citizenship education.
The purpose of this study is to develop critical understanding of U.S. youths’ citizenship as they live and experience it in a multicultural society. Shaped within the conceptual framework viewing citizenship as ‘membership’ in a society, and acknowledging the impact of the politics of institutionalized social relations and the social process on individual’s identity formation as a citizen, the study employs poststructural feminist theory to frame its inductive qualitative design. Using purposive samples of 28 high school juniors and seniors exposed to advanced social studies curriculum in two public schools in the urban/suburban north-east U.S, the data was collected during a 12-week period through class and school activities observations, researcher’s journaling, small group interviews of students, and follow-up individual interviews.
This paper focuses on few dominant findings that reveal youths’ understanding of spaces and processes of learning versus experiencing citizenship in today’s U.S. society focused on achievement. The construction of youths’ citizenship identity is seen as occurring within varying individual struggles to balance societal expectations of citizens defined through “success” and one’s own motivation to learn and engage through the opportunities (non)presented in the larger context of youths’ communities. The importance of this study is in discussing youths’ perspectives on citizenship, and the implications of youths’ constructs for designing future citizenship education programs that focus on enabling youth develop their agency and voice as members of a multicultural society.

Author's Keywords:

youth, citizenship identity
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486470_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Josic, Jasmina. "Learning, experiencing, and constructing citizenship in the "success" oriented society: U.S. youths’ perspectives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486470_index.html>

APA Citation:

Josic, J. , 2011-04-30 "Learning, experiencing, and constructing citizenship in the "success" oriented society: U.S. youths’ perspectives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486470_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With the impact of globalization in various spheres of society, today’s youth are forming new forms of membership within multidimensional spheres of their experiences. Acknowledging the changes in the youths' life experiences, there is a growing argument within education for expanding the understanding of conceptualization of citizenship and its implication for citizenship education.
The purpose of this study is to develop critical understanding of U.S. youths’ citizenship as they live and experience it in a multicultural society. Shaped within the conceptual framework viewing citizenship as ‘membership’ in a society, and acknowledging the impact of the politics of institutionalized social relations and the social process on individual’s identity formation as a citizen, the study employs poststructural feminist theory to frame its inductive qualitative design. Using purposive samples of 28 high school juniors and seniors exposed to advanced social studies curriculum in two public schools in the urban/suburban north-east U.S, the data was collected during a 12-week period through class and school activities observations, researcher’s journaling, small group interviews of students, and follow-up individual interviews.
This paper focuses on few dominant findings that reveal youths’ understanding of spaces and processes of learning versus experiencing citizenship in today’s U.S. society focused on achievement. The construction of youths’ citizenship identity is seen as occurring within varying individual struggles to balance societal expectations of citizens defined through “success” and one’s own motivation to learn and engage through the opportunities (non)presented in the larger context of youths’ communities. The importance of this study is in discussing youths’ perspectives on citizenship, and the implications of youths’ constructs for designing future citizenship education programs that focus on enabling youth develop their agency and voice as members of a multicultural society.


Similar Titles:
A comparative perspective on LGBT youth experiencing multiple youth-serving systems

Critical understanding of U.S. youths’ citizenship: Implications for citizenship education in the multicultural society

Self- Censorship Orientation (SCO) among members of society in conflict: The construction of A Self-Censorship Orientation Scale


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.