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Indigenous Peoples in History: A Comparison of Japanese and US high school textbook narratives

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Abstract:

The mandate to respect indigenous peoples presents a persistent challenge to the democratic, multicultural ethos that educators have come to embrace, because of their prerogative of preserving an identity that is both variant and separate from the majority culture of a given society. In discussions of multiculturalism and educational diversity, which emphasize of equity and empowerment for minority groups (e.g., Banks, 2003), much importance is placed on inclusion of minority groups within the larger society, and this is to be reflected in the content of the curriculum. Recognition of a group's contributions to the larger society, as well as wrongs they have suffered at the hands of the majority, goes hand in hand with tolerance of differences—even differences the majority find difficult to embrace (Gutman, 2004). Yet all these goals stated for domestic minority group treatment address mainly the inclusion side of multiculturalism. However, indigenous peoples also deserve to be treated as the separate nations that they are, and inclusionary principles do not emphasize this. Kymlicka and Norman (2000) argue for indigenous peoples' rightful claim to the maintenance of traditional beliefs and lifestyles while "participating on their own terms in the modern world." In the present study, US and Japanese high school history textbooks were examined for ways in which indigenous peoples are presented in textual narratives. Comparative analysis found that the number of indigenous groups in the US makes for much greater coverage, while both sets of texts struggled to present indigenous peoples in ways that are inclusive within the modern nation-state, but both largely failed to portray the historical narrative of conquest from the indigenous voice.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486491_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Matsumoto, Mami. and Langager, Mark. "Indigenous Peoples in History: A Comparison of Japanese and US high school textbook narratives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486491_index.html>

APA Citation:

Matsumoto, M. and Langager, M. W. , 2011-04-30 "Indigenous Peoples in History: A Comparison of Japanese and US high school textbook narratives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486491_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The mandate to respect indigenous peoples presents a persistent challenge to the democratic, multicultural ethos that educators have come to embrace, because of their prerogative of preserving an identity that is both variant and separate from the majority culture of a given society. In discussions of multiculturalism and educational diversity, which emphasize of equity and empowerment for minority groups (e.g., Banks, 2003), much importance is placed on inclusion of minority groups within the larger society, and this is to be reflected in the content of the curriculum. Recognition of a group's contributions to the larger society, as well as wrongs they have suffered at the hands of the majority, goes hand in hand with tolerance of differences—even differences the majority find difficult to embrace (Gutman, 2004). Yet all these goals stated for domestic minority group treatment address mainly the inclusion side of multiculturalism. However, indigenous peoples also deserve to be treated as the separate nations that they are, and inclusionary principles do not emphasize this. Kymlicka and Norman (2000) argue for indigenous peoples' rightful claim to the maintenance of traditional beliefs and lifestyles while "participating on their own terms in the modern world." In the present study, US and Japanese high school history textbooks were examined for ways in which indigenous peoples are presented in textual narratives. Comparative analysis found that the number of indigenous groups in the US makes for much greater coverage, while both sets of texts struggled to present indigenous peoples in ways that are inclusive within the modern nation-state, but both largely failed to portray the historical narrative of conquest from the indigenous voice.


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