Citation

Imagining Japan’s "Relaxed Education" curriculum: Continuity or change?

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper examines the translation and implementation of the yutori kyoiku (“relaxed education”) reforms in Japanese schools. In response to critics who asserted that the heavy emphases on examinations were at the root of a variety of social problems, especially for students, the Ministry of Education (MOE) explored steps that could be taken to reduce the pressures experienced by students and to augment their motivation to learn. Analysis of this movement yields valuable information about an education system that is often mischaracterized, sensationalized, and misunderstood. Drawing from qualitative data collected over a seven-year period, I document educators’ responses to policy directives, and connect the decisions they make to the social, institutional, and psychological exigencies that organize their professional lives. MOE’s promotion of yutori kyoiku has forced educators to reexamine core beliefs about the purpose of schooling, attitudes and skills that students need to succeed in contemporary society, and teacher’s roles in the classroom. Even within an administrative system with a reputation for its concentration of power at the top (Horio, 1988; Shimahara, 1986), school-based actors have used their autonomy to shape MOE reform plans to fit the institutional cultures in which they work. The decisions educators made as they assessed the costs and benefits of following Ministry recommendations, I would argue, largely determined whether the changes forecast by educational officials were ‘real’ or ‘imagined’. Teachers resisted pressure to alter established practices if the proposed changes conflicted with the priorities they had established for themselves and their pupils.

Author's Keywords:

Japan, Relaxed Education, Citizenship Education
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486509_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Bjork, Chris. "Imagining Japan’s "Relaxed Education" curriculum: Continuity or change?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486509_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bjork, C. "Imagining Japan’s "Relaxed Education" curriculum: Continuity or change?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486509_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper examines the translation and implementation of the yutori kyoiku (“relaxed education”) reforms in Japanese schools. In response to critics who asserted that the heavy emphases on examinations were at the root of a variety of social problems, especially for students, the Ministry of Education (MOE) explored steps that could be taken to reduce the pressures experienced by students and to augment their motivation to learn. Analysis of this movement yields valuable information about an education system that is often mischaracterized, sensationalized, and misunderstood. Drawing from qualitative data collected over a seven-year period, I document educators’ responses to policy directives, and connect the decisions they make to the social, institutional, and psychological exigencies that organize their professional lives. MOE’s promotion of yutori kyoiku has forced educators to reexamine core beliefs about the purpose of schooling, attitudes and skills that students need to succeed in contemporary society, and teacher’s roles in the classroom. Even within an administrative system with a reputation for its concentration of power at the top (Horio, 1988; Shimahara, 1986), school-based actors have used their autonomy to shape MOE reform plans to fit the institutional cultures in which they work. The decisions educators made as they assessed the costs and benefits of following Ministry recommendations, I would argue, largely determined whether the changes forecast by educational officials were ‘real’ or ‘imagined’. Teachers resisted pressure to alter established practices if the proposed changes conflicted with the priorities they had established for themselves and their pupils.


Similar Titles:
Teacher Education Programs Under Attack! A Panel of Teacher Education Administrators and Experts Discussing Their Curriculum Changes

Transition of “international education” in formal school curriculum of Japan: From “Education for International Understanding” to “Education for Sustainable Development”

Music Education Change: A Change More than a Curriculum


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.