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Preparing refugee students for citizenship in the United States: Education for liberation or peripheralization?

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Abstract:

Although more refugee students resettle in the United States than in any other country, little research examines the ways that schools in the United States prepare these students to participate in their political community. An increasing number of these students attend schools that intend to prepare students as global citizens. The broad purpose of this study was to understand how two different schools positioned within a rhetoric of celebrating global citizenship prepare refugee students for citizenship in the United States. This paper draws on one year of participant observations in classrooms within the two schools to answer the following questions: 1) How does the implemented curriculum, including content, pedagogy, and climate, educate students for citizenship? 2) How does the implemented curriculum intersect with or contradict the goal of education for liberation?

My understanding of citizenship uses a post-colonial lens to extend Osler and Starkey’s (2005) conception of citizenship as status, feeling, and practice. As individuals are concurrently members of a wide variety of communities; a post-colonial interpretation recognizes that students are being educated for citizenship in a world with unequal relations between different communities. Findings describe classrooms that vary widely in the types of citizenship practiced by students and advocated by teachers. Teachers in the charter school were more likely to facilitate a classroom where refugee students were educated for active and respectful global citizenship, whereas teachers in the second school espoused a more limited, U.S.-centered conception of citizenship.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486517_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Quaynor, Laura. "Preparing refugee students for citizenship in the United States: Education for liberation or peripheralization?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486517_index.html>

APA Citation:

Quaynor, L. , 2011-04-30 "Preparing refugee students for citizenship in the United States: Education for liberation or peripheralization?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486517_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although more refugee students resettle in the United States than in any other country, little research examines the ways that schools in the United States prepare these students to participate in their political community. An increasing number of these students attend schools that intend to prepare students as global citizens. The broad purpose of this study was to understand how two different schools positioned within a rhetoric of celebrating global citizenship prepare refugee students for citizenship in the United States. This paper draws on one year of participant observations in classrooms within the two schools to answer the following questions: 1) How does the implemented curriculum, including content, pedagogy, and climate, educate students for citizenship? 2) How does the implemented curriculum intersect with or contradict the goal of education for liberation?

My understanding of citizenship uses a post-colonial lens to extend Osler and Starkey’s (2005) conception of citizenship as status, feeling, and practice. As individuals are concurrently members of a wide variety of communities; a post-colonial interpretation recognizes that students are being educated for citizenship in a world with unequal relations between different communities. Findings describe classrooms that vary widely in the types of citizenship practiced by students and advocated by teachers. Teachers in the charter school were more likely to facilitate a classroom where refugee students were educated for active and respectful global citizenship, whereas teachers in the second school espoused a more limited, U.S.-centered conception of citizenship.


Similar Titles:
Complications in the global diffusion of liberal multiculturalism: The case of Chaldean Iraqi students in Jordan and the United States

Teaching transnational students across contexts: Social studies teachers’ conceptions of citizenship in Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States

Contributions of African-American Pedagogues to the evolution of Global Citizenship Education in the United States


 
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