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Information and communication technology as "Normative good"? Curricular reform in the Gulf Cooperative Council nations

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Abstract:

Countries across the Gulf Cooperative Council (GCC) have begun to reform national curricula to reflect international trends related to the incorporation of information and communication technology (ICT) to achieve national economic development goals and increase global economic participation. ICT integration is thought to be part of the "normative good" associated with educating individuals to become autonomous learners capable of effective skill transfer to achieve diverse political, social, and economic goals (Oelkers & Klee, 2007; Rosenmund, 2007). Despite the perception that ICT-education will lead to human capital development, individuals may not be able to fully develop or transfer their "capital" to achieve national economic goals because of socio-cultural factors in the region. The institutionalization of "ICT as normative good" policy discourse is uniquely complex in the GCC because of the perception that students' cultural and religious values may be compromised by exposure to Western and non-Islamic ideologies through ICT use at school. Considering the social and cultural contexts of the region, why is the incorporation of ICT in national curricula viewed as the most effective way to develop human capital to achieve economic development goals? Using data from the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and analysis of national education policy documents in the GCC, this paper examines how ICT is integrated into classroom instruction, how the "ICT as normative good" discourse is communicated in education policies, and the impact of ICT- education on human capital development in Islamic society.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486521_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Anderson, Emily. "Information and communication technology as "Normative good"? Curricular reform in the Gulf Cooperative Council nations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486521_index.html>

APA Citation:

Anderson, E. "Information and communication technology as "Normative good"? Curricular reform in the Gulf Cooperative Council nations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486521_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Countries across the Gulf Cooperative Council (GCC) have begun to reform national curricula to reflect international trends related to the incorporation of information and communication technology (ICT) to achieve national economic development goals and increase global economic participation. ICT integration is thought to be part of the "normative good" associated with educating individuals to become autonomous learners capable of effective skill transfer to achieve diverse political, social, and economic goals (Oelkers & Klee, 2007; Rosenmund, 2007). Despite the perception that ICT-education will lead to human capital development, individuals may not be able to fully develop or transfer their "capital" to achieve national economic goals because of socio-cultural factors in the region. The institutionalization of "ICT as normative good" policy discourse is uniquely complex in the GCC because of the perception that students' cultural and religious values may be compromised by exposure to Western and non-Islamic ideologies through ICT use at school. Considering the social and cultural contexts of the region, why is the incorporation of ICT in national curricula viewed as the most effective way to develop human capital to achieve economic development goals? Using data from the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and analysis of national education policy documents in the GCC, this paper examines how ICT is integrated into classroom instruction, how the "ICT as normative good" discourse is communicated in education policies, and the impact of ICT- education on human capital development in Islamic society.


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