Citation

GROUP 1. Growth as product and as process: Student learning outcomes (un)achieved through college experiences in China

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

I. Statement of research topic, questions, and objectives
My dissertation aims at answering three research questions: (1) In what domains, and to what extent, are learning outcomes expected and achieved as reported by college students in China; (2) why do reports regarding these domains of learning outcomes differ among individuals and institutions, and (3) how can these learning outcomes be improved with research findings and the research process, and through policies and practices?
The first “what” question seeks to describe, that is, to provide a detailed account of the dimensions of learning outcomes as perceived by college students. The “why” question aims at explanation and understanding. In this study, explanation is provided through analysis of a national survey of more than 30,000 college students from 27 universities in China, and understanding is based on data from interviews in five universities that elicit an ‘insider’s view of students’ conceptualizing and making sense of their growth in college.
The last “how” question addresses the fundamental objective of social science research, that is, to bring about changes. Inspired to answer “the only question important to us: What shall we do and how shall we live”(Weber, 1918), my study seeks to lead to changes through action research.

II. Theoretical Framework
This study builds upon and attempts to bridge two bodies of scholarship on college student change – college impact models and student development theories. In particular, Pascarella’s General Causal Model of College Impact (1985) and the conceptual lens of self-authorship (Baxter Magolda, 2001) are the two theoretical pillars of this study.
College impact models are concerned with external sources and contextual origins for student change. Pascarella’s model identifies five sets of variables of institutional environment and student background that are presumed to have impact on learning and cognitive development. In contrast, student development theories see environmental origins as secondary to individual origins for change. This class of theories addresses the nature, structure and processes that define individual, human growth. For example, self-authorship, or “the internal capacity to define one’s belief system, identity, and relationships” (Baxter Magolda, 2001, p. xvi) underscores the intertwining of the cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal dimensions in learning and development.
Divided in their disciplinary roots, research methods, and target research consumers, these two bodies of theories are rarely presented in a single study. Nevertheless, focusing on one class of theories in exclusion to the other is “not only likely to result in misspecification of the collegiate change process, but also to be dysfunctional, leading to poor theory, poor research, and poor practice” (Terenzini, 1987). In response to this, my study will contribute to theoretical advancement by bridging college impact models and student development theories through developing common themes examined from two theoretical angles.

III. Methodology and Research Design
My study employs a mixed research design to answer the first two questions. In response to the third research question, I will conduct action research at one university as the “action site”.
The two phases of mixed research are designed to strengthen the validity of the findings and to bridge the two theoretical pillars by relating the quantitative and qualitative data. In the first phase of quantitative data analysis, I use the NSSE-China 2009 dataset to answer the first two questions through descriptive and correlational statistical analyses. In the second phase of qualitative data collection and analysis, I am conducting in-depth student interviews in five universities in China. The five institutions are among 27 NSSE-China participating institutions, of various types and in different regions of China, and ten students were recruited for individual interviews and five students for a focus group discussion at each institution.
Among the five universities for student interviews, I have chosen S University as the action site. The action research component of my dissertation study is characterized by three “C”s: conversation with student participants, communication with campus stakeholders, and collaboration with local researchers.


Baxter Magolda, M. B. (2001). Making their own way: Narratives for transforming higher education to promote self-development. Sterling, VA: Stylus.
Pascarella, E. T. (1985). College environmental influences on learning and cognitive development: A critical review and synthesis. In J. Smart (Ed.), Higher education: Handbook of theory and research (Vol. 1). New York: Agathon.
Terenzini, P. T. (1987). A review of selected theoretical models of student development and collegiate impact. Paper presented at the ASHE Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD.
Weber, M. (1918). Science as a vocation. In H. H. Gerth & C. Wright Mills (Eds.), From Max Weber: Essays in sociology. New York: Oxford University Press, 1946.

Author's Keywords:

Student Development
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486910_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Cen, Yuhao. "GROUP 1. Growth as product and as process: Student learning outcomes (un)achieved through college experiences in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486910_index.html>

APA Citation:

Cen, Y. , 2011-05-01 "GROUP 1. Growth as product and as process: Student learning outcomes (un)achieved through college experiences in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486910_index.html

Publication Type: CIES New Scholar Fellow Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I. Statement of research topic, questions, and objectives
My dissertation aims at answering three research questions: (1) In what domains, and to what extent, are learning outcomes expected and achieved as reported by college students in China; (2) why do reports regarding these domains of learning outcomes differ among individuals and institutions, and (3) how can these learning outcomes be improved with research findings and the research process, and through policies and practices?
The first “what” question seeks to describe, that is, to provide a detailed account of the dimensions of learning outcomes as perceived by college students. The “why” question aims at explanation and understanding. In this study, explanation is provided through analysis of a national survey of more than 30,000 college students from 27 universities in China, and understanding is based on data from interviews in five universities that elicit an ‘insider’s view of students’ conceptualizing and making sense of their growth in college.
The last “how” question addresses the fundamental objective of social science research, that is, to bring about changes. Inspired to answer “the only question important to us: What shall we do and how shall we live”(Weber, 1918), my study seeks to lead to changes through action research.

II. Theoretical Framework
This study builds upon and attempts to bridge two bodies of scholarship on college student change – college impact models and student development theories. In particular, Pascarella’s General Causal Model of College Impact (1985) and the conceptual lens of self-authorship (Baxter Magolda, 2001) are the two theoretical pillars of this study.
College impact models are concerned with external sources and contextual origins for student change. Pascarella’s model identifies five sets of variables of institutional environment and student background that are presumed to have impact on learning and cognitive development. In contrast, student development theories see environmental origins as secondary to individual origins for change. This class of theories addresses the nature, structure and processes that define individual, human growth. For example, self-authorship, or “the internal capacity to define one’s belief system, identity, and relationships” (Baxter Magolda, 2001, p. xvi) underscores the intertwining of the cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal dimensions in learning and development.
Divided in their disciplinary roots, research methods, and target research consumers, these two bodies of theories are rarely presented in a single study. Nevertheless, focusing on one class of theories in exclusion to the other is “not only likely to result in misspecification of the collegiate change process, but also to be dysfunctional, leading to poor theory, poor research, and poor practice” (Terenzini, 1987). In response to this, my study will contribute to theoretical advancement by bridging college impact models and student development theories through developing common themes examined from two theoretical angles.

III. Methodology and Research Design
My study employs a mixed research design to answer the first two questions. In response to the third research question, I will conduct action research at one university as the “action site”.
The two phases of mixed research are designed to strengthen the validity of the findings and to bridge the two theoretical pillars by relating the quantitative and qualitative data. In the first phase of quantitative data analysis, I use the NSSE-China 2009 dataset to answer the first two questions through descriptive and correlational statistical analyses. In the second phase of qualitative data collection and analysis, I am conducting in-depth student interviews in five universities in China. The five institutions are among 27 NSSE-China participating institutions, of various types and in different regions of China, and ten students were recruited for individual interviews and five students for a focus group discussion at each institution.
Among the five universities for student interviews, I have chosen S University as the action site. The action research component of my dissertation study is characterized by three “C”s: conversation with student participants, communication with campus stakeholders, and collaboration with local researchers.


Baxter Magolda, M. B. (2001). Making their own way: Narratives for transforming higher education to promote self-development. Sterling, VA: Stylus.
Pascarella, E. T. (1985). College environmental influences on learning and cognitive development: A critical review and synthesis. In J. Smart (Ed.), Higher education: Handbook of theory and research (Vol. 1). New York: Agathon.
Terenzini, P. T. (1987). A review of selected theoretical models of student development and collegiate impact. Paper presented at the ASHE Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD.
Weber, M. (1918). Science as a vocation. In H. H. Gerth & C. Wright Mills (Eds.), From Max Weber: Essays in sociology. New York: Oxford University Press, 1946.


Similar Titles:
Beyond NSSE-China: Looking deep to link student engagement and learning outcomes in Chinese colleges

In their own words and by the numbers: A mixed methods study on college student learning outcomes in China

The Processes of Learning in a Computer Algebra System (CAS) Environment for College Students Learning Calculus


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.