Citation

Shoot, Score, Strip? Media Representations of Female Athletes and Their Impact on Collegiate Athletes

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Many studies offer clear evidence that exposure to glamorized and sexualized media images results in distorted body-image perceptions in girls and young women. Recent scholarship has examined the link between sports media exposure and the negative effect on body perceptions of young girls and women, though a gap exists in the examination of the relationship between media images and positive impact. Grounded in the theories of self-objectification and social comparison theory, this study tested the relationships between self-objectification and body esteem and sports media exposure. Using a between-participants experimental design, this study examined how three different images of elite female athletes – performance, glamorized, and overly sexualized – impacted collegiate-level female athlete’s tendency to self-objectify and their levels of body esteem. Results suggest that less self-objectification occurs and greater body satisfaction is achieved when images of performance athletes are viewed, suggesting a need for more of these images in mainstream media.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

athlet (148), femal (89), media (76), imag (74), sport (74), bodi (64), women (64), particip (62), sexual (47), comparison (44), m (41), social (36), self (32), objectif (32), score (31), research (31), view (30), glamor (27), shoot (27), strip (26), j (26),
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p490183_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Smith, Lauren. "Shoot, Score, Strip? Media Representations of Female Athletes and Their Impact on Collegiate Athletes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p490183_index.html>

APA Citation:

Smith, L. R. , 2011-05-25 "Shoot, Score, Strip? Media Representations of Female Athletes and Their Impact on Collegiate Athletes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA Online <PDF>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p490183_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many studies offer clear evidence that exposure to glamorized and sexualized media images results in distorted body-image perceptions in girls and young women. Recent scholarship has examined the link between sports media exposure and the negative effect on body perceptions of young girls and women, though a gap exists in the examination of the relationship between media images and positive impact. Grounded in the theories of self-objectification and social comparison theory, this study tested the relationships between self-objectification and body esteem and sports media exposure. Using a between-participants experimental design, this study examined how three different images of elite female athletes – performance, glamorized, and overly sexualized – impacted collegiate-level female athlete’s tendency to self-objectify and their levels of body esteem. Results suggest that less self-objectification occurs and greater body satisfaction is achieved when images of performance athletes are viewed, suggesting a need for more of these images in mainstream media.


Similar Titles:
Facebook and College Women’s Bodies: Social Media’s Influence on Body Image and Disordered Eating

"They never do this to men": College women athletes' responses to sexualized images of professional female athletes

Female Objectification and Media Influence on Women’s Physical Ideals: A Qualitative Feminist Analysis of Female Beauty and Body Image Identity

Look @ Me 2.0: Self-Sexualization in Facebook Photos, Self-Objectification, and Body Image in Women


 
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