Citation

Linguistic imperialism in Mexico

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper attempts to fill an existing gap in language research on attitudes towards language. Specifically, it focuses on perceptions of English held by Mexican learners of English as a foreign language (EFL).

First, differences between perceptions and attitudes are analyzed and contextual details are provided regarding how English fits into Mexico’s ethnolinguistic reality, especially in Education.

Second, the results of an empirical online survey that involved 300 university students studying at the Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla (UPAEP) in Mexico are presented to highlight differing perceptions towards English. Results clearly show great extrinsic motivation to learn English because of the special status that it enjoys worldwide and in Mexico. Nevertheless, the data also suggest significant negative perceptions of English since consciously or unconsciously, learners automatically perceive English as being related to historic, economic, political and socio cultural problems that have plagued Mexican-American relations. The role of these negative perceptions will be discussed as they play a role in Mexicans’ difficulties learning English; their role is situated in terms of colonialism, modernity and current trends in linguistic imperialism (Escobar, 2005; Mignolo, 2005; Phillipson, 1992, 2009).

The paper raises a discussion of the potential for a critical approach to autonomy in language learning to influence negative attitudes and even a blockage towards learning English (Benson, 1997; Pennycook, 1997, 2001). Language learning and language teaching, especially EFL, are bound up with issues of power that must be addressed in classroom settings. This research therefore opens up possible directions for future research in Mexico that will develop the participants’ ability to think critically about languages and “work out ideological alternatives that favour their own empowerment” (Canagarajah, 1999:2).

Author's Keywords:

Perceptions, EFL, linguistic imperialism
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492056_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Despagne, Colette. "Linguistic imperialism in Mexico" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492056_index.html>

APA Citation:

Despagne, C. , 2011-04-30 "Linguistic imperialism in Mexico" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492056_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper attempts to fill an existing gap in language research on attitudes towards language. Specifically, it focuses on perceptions of English held by Mexican learners of English as a foreign language (EFL).

First, differences between perceptions and attitudes are analyzed and contextual details are provided regarding how English fits into Mexico’s ethnolinguistic reality, especially in Education.

Second, the results of an empirical online survey that involved 300 university students studying at the Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla (UPAEP) in Mexico are presented to highlight differing perceptions towards English. Results clearly show great extrinsic motivation to learn English because of the special status that it enjoys worldwide and in Mexico. Nevertheless, the data also suggest significant negative perceptions of English since consciously or unconsciously, learners automatically perceive English as being related to historic, economic, political and socio cultural problems that have plagued Mexican-American relations. The role of these negative perceptions will be discussed as they play a role in Mexicans’ difficulties learning English; their role is situated in terms of colonialism, modernity and current trends in linguistic imperialism (Escobar, 2005; Mignolo, 2005; Phillipson, 1992, 2009).

The paper raises a discussion of the potential for a critical approach to autonomy in language learning to influence negative attitudes and even a blockage towards learning English (Benson, 1997; Pennycook, 1997, 2001). Language learning and language teaching, especially EFL, are bound up with issues of power that must be addressed in classroom settings. This research therefore opens up possible directions for future research in Mexico that will develop the participants’ ability to think critically about languages and “work out ideological alternatives that favour their own empowerment” (Canagarajah, 1999:2).


Similar Titles:
Short-term effects of keepin’it REAL pilot prevention program: Linguistically adapted for youth in Jalisco, Mexico

Imperialismus Interruptus: Confronting Gay Imperialism in Mexico


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.