Citation

The Myth of Media Multitasking: A Dynamic Panel Analysis of Media Multitasking, Needs, and Gratifications

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Abstract:

Laboratory research consistently confirms that multitasking can impair task performance and even chronically deteriorate cognitive functions. However, against this growing body of evidence is increasing popularity of media multitasking behavior frequently reported in national surveys. This study is an attempt to clarify this “myth” of multitasking (Rosen, 2008). Using dynamic panel analysis of data collected from college students across four weeks, this study examines dynamic reciprocal impacts of media multitasking behavior, underlying motivation as specified by four categories of needs, and corresponding gratifications. Consistent with and connecting findings in both the laboratory and real-life media multitasking, this study provides evidence of dynamic persistence of media multitasking behavior, which may be further reinforced by emotional and habitual gratifications despite that emotional gratifications is not actively sought. Among these dynamic influences, individual heterogeneity in neuroticism is found. Those with higher neuroticism are more likely to engage in media multitasking.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

multitask (165), need (158), media (136), model (114), gratif (96), dynam (92), behavior (77), time (61), effect (59), 1 (55), panel (51), feedback (47), cognit (46), analysi (44), m (43), use (42), 2 (37), emot (34), data (33), lag (33), increas (32),
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492162_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Wang, Zheng. and Tchernev, John. "The Myth of Media Multitasking: A Dynamic Panel Analysis of Media Multitasking, Needs, and Gratifications" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492162_index.html>

APA Citation:

Wang, Z. J. and Tchernev, J. , 2011-05-25 "The Myth of Media Multitasking: A Dynamic Panel Analysis of Media Multitasking, Needs, and Gratifications" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492162_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Laboratory research consistently confirms that multitasking can impair task performance and even chronically deteriorate cognitive functions. However, against this growing body of evidence is increasing popularity of media multitasking behavior frequently reported in national surveys. This study is an attempt to clarify this “myth” of multitasking (Rosen, 2008). Using dynamic panel analysis of data collected from college students across four weeks, this study examines dynamic reciprocal impacts of media multitasking behavior, underlying motivation as specified by four categories of needs, and corresponding gratifications. Consistent with and connecting findings in both the laboratory and real-life media multitasking, this study provides evidence of dynamic persistence of media multitasking behavior, which may be further reinforced by emotional and habitual gratifications despite that emotional gratifications is not actively sought. Among these dynamic influences, individual heterogeneity in neuroticism is found. Those with higher neuroticism are more likely to engage in media multitasking.


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