Citation

Community identified barriers to girls’ education in rural Malawi: What girls and boys say about absenteeism, repetition and drop out

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Since Malawi introduced free primary education in 1994, it has struggled to cope with dramatically increased student enrollment and decreasing quality. The education sector has become funnel-like in nature, with large numbers of students entering, but only a few progressing and graduating (Education Sector Implementation Plan, 2009). Furthermore, large gender disparities exist: more girls than boys are enrolled in Standard 1, but far fewer girls than boys graduate from Standard 8 (EMIS, 2009). Girls are at greater risk of absenteeism, repetition and drop out, and have lower educational achievement than boys in upper primary school (Mantandala, 2010).

This study assesses barriers to girls’ progression, completion and achievement in Malawi’s rural primary schools. Obstacles are identified through statistical analysis of EMIS data and through interviews and focus group sessions with over 650 community members: 59 parents, 53 teachers, and 542 4th-7th grade girls and boys. Among these children, 89.9% of girls and 84.8% of boys have already repeated at least one standard. This analysis reveals the order and frequency of the most prevalent barriers to girls’ education: household chores, frequent tardiness to school, lack of clean clothes, early marriage, early pregnancy, and lack of family and community support. Finally, the paper highlights practices that have shown promise in overcoming these obstacles (Mother Groups, teacher sensitization, role models and mentors, and the provision of school materials) and assesses their potential for scalability. The analysis reveals gaps and offers insight into how to increase the effectiveness of programming for girls’ primary education in rural Malawi, with implications for programs around the world.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492365_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Kavazanjian, Laura. "Community identified barriers to girls’ education in rural Malawi: What girls and boys say about absenteeism, repetition and drop out" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492365_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kavazanjian, L. , 2011-04-30 "Community identified barriers to girls’ education in rural Malawi: What girls and boys say about absenteeism, repetition and drop out" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492365_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since Malawi introduced free primary education in 1994, it has struggled to cope with dramatically increased student enrollment and decreasing quality. The education sector has become funnel-like in nature, with large numbers of students entering, but only a few progressing and graduating (Education Sector Implementation Plan, 2009). Furthermore, large gender disparities exist: more girls than boys are enrolled in Standard 1, but far fewer girls than boys graduate from Standard 8 (EMIS, 2009). Girls are at greater risk of absenteeism, repetition and drop out, and have lower educational achievement than boys in upper primary school (Mantandala, 2010).

This study assesses barriers to girls’ progression, completion and achievement in Malawi’s rural primary schools. Obstacles are identified through statistical analysis of EMIS data and through interviews and focus group sessions with over 650 community members: 59 parents, 53 teachers, and 542 4th-7th grade girls and boys. Among these children, 89.9% of girls and 84.8% of boys have already repeated at least one standard. This analysis reveals the order and frequency of the most prevalent barriers to girls’ education: household chores, frequent tardiness to school, lack of clean clothes, early marriage, early pregnancy, and lack of family and community support. Finally, the paper highlights practices that have shown promise in overcoming these obstacles (Mother Groups, teacher sensitization, role models and mentors, and the provision of school materials) and assesses their potential for scalability. The analysis reveals gaps and offers insight into how to increase the effectiveness of programming for girls’ primary education in rural Malawi, with implications for programs around the world.


Similar Titles:
Girls' rural educational access with community help (Girls' REACH): Policies to increase girls' educational opportunities in rural Lao PDR

Researching educational barriers for rural secondary school girls in Tajikistan and efforts to overcome them

Rural Girls Doing and Being Educated through Grass -Roots INGO’s: Examining Community Tensions and Transformations


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.