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Privatization as unfortunately necessary or inherently desirable: A discursive analysis of World Bank education policy

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Abstract:

This paper provides a critical analysis of policy discourse at the World Bank with two overarching aims. First, to highlight numerous contradictory statements embedded in the discourse of the Bank’s policy documents and second, to interrogate the ideological foundations of the Bank’s policies with an objective of determining the roots of these contradictions.

As a conceptual framework, I adopt a distinction first introduced by Keith Hinchliffe (1993) to frame the two ways in which international actors might envision the inclusion of market mechanisms in education, namely as “unfortunately necessary” or “inherently desirable.” It is argued in this paper that the World Bank straddles these two, often times contradictory, positions.

As a methodological approach, this paper conducts a discursive analysis of the World Bank’s education policy documents, to determine the answers to such questions as: What conceptual frameworks are being adopted? What positions are advocated? What evidence is being employed and why? What concepts and positions have been omitted? Via a critical discourse analysis, I moreover evaluate the World Bank’s policies in light of the ideological, conceptual and logical framing of arguments.

The paper concludes by arguing that the World Bank’s policy discourse demonstrates a contradictory approach to educational financing and provision by framing it as both a public and a private good, where privatization is concurrently deemed both unfortunately necessary and inherently desirable.
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Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492588_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Menashy, Francine. "Privatization as unfortunately necessary or inherently desirable: A discursive analysis of World Bank education policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492588_index.html>

APA Citation:

Menashy, F. , 2011-04-30 "Privatization as unfortunately necessary or inherently desirable: A discursive analysis of World Bank education policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492588_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper provides a critical analysis of policy discourse at the World Bank with two overarching aims. First, to highlight numerous contradictory statements embedded in the discourse of the Bank’s policy documents and second, to interrogate the ideological foundations of the Bank’s policies with an objective of determining the roots of these contradictions.

As a conceptual framework, I adopt a distinction first introduced by Keith Hinchliffe (1993) to frame the two ways in which international actors might envision the inclusion of market mechanisms in education, namely as “unfortunately necessary” or “inherently desirable.” It is argued in this paper that the World Bank straddles these two, often times contradictory, positions.

As a methodological approach, this paper conducts a discursive analysis of the World Bank’s education policy documents, to determine the answers to such questions as: What conceptual frameworks are being adopted? What positions are advocated? What evidence is being employed and why? What concepts and positions have been omitted? Via a critical discourse analysis, I moreover evaluate the World Bank’s policies in light of the ideological, conceptual and logical framing of arguments.

The paper concludes by arguing that the World Bank’s policy discourse demonstrates a contradictory approach to educational financing and provision by framing it as both a public and a private good, where privatization is concurrently deemed both unfortunately necessary and inherently desirable.


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Testing the Knowledge Bank: An examination of the World Bank’s knowledge mobilization efforts around public-private partnerships in education


 
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