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School principals and accountability policies: A Quebec-Ontario comparison

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Abstract:

This paper looks at how accountability policies are perceived by the school principals of Toronto and Montreal, two multiethnic, socially differentiated Canadian cities situated in the two biggest and more or less similar provinces. We will shortly describe the relatively different accountability policies and devices that have taken place in both provinces in the last decade. Three dimensions of policy response are then analyzed: 1) the perceived legitimacy of accountability mechanisms, 2) use of such assessment tools, and 3) perceptions of the effects that these devices and tools have had on the work and workload of high schools principals. Data were collected from pan Canadian qualitative survey aimed at working condition of school personnel (28 interviews) in 2006 and 17 more in-depth interviews were conducted in both cities in 2009. Following Harris and Herrington (2006) that distinguish the logics of market-based and accountability-based governance in education, the study shows that both provinces are situated at the confluence of these two mechanisms, but in different ways. Among other conclusions, evidences shows that Québec province is more inclined towards market-based accountability, with pressure coming from a school ranking produced by a conservative think tank, and had face difficulties implanting a standard-based accountability device set by the state. In contrast, the Government-based accountability, through the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) since over a decade, in Ontario, acts as a counterweight to the market-based accountability that enables school principals to steer clear of additional pressure coming from parents and enrollment fluctuations.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492758_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Desjardins, Pierre-David. and Lessard, Claude. "School principals and accountability policies: A Quebec-Ontario comparison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492758_index.html>

APA Citation:

Desjardins, P. and Lessard, C. "School principals and accountability policies: A Quebec-Ontario comparison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492758_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper looks at how accountability policies are perceived by the school principals of Toronto and Montreal, two multiethnic, socially differentiated Canadian cities situated in the two biggest and more or less similar provinces. We will shortly describe the relatively different accountability policies and devices that have taken place in both provinces in the last decade. Three dimensions of policy response are then analyzed: 1) the perceived legitimacy of accountability mechanisms, 2) use of such assessment tools, and 3) perceptions of the effects that these devices and tools have had on the work and workload of high schools principals. Data were collected from pan Canadian qualitative survey aimed at working condition of school personnel (28 interviews) in 2006 and 17 more in-depth interviews were conducted in both cities in 2009. Following Harris and Herrington (2006) that distinguish the logics of market-based and accountability-based governance in education, the study shows that both provinces are situated at the confluence of these two mechanisms, but in different ways. Among other conclusions, evidences shows that Québec province is more inclined towards market-based accountability, with pressure coming from a school ranking produced by a conservative think tank, and had face difficulties implanting a standard-based accountability device set by the state. In contrast, the Government-based accountability, through the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) since over a decade, in Ontario, acts as a counterweight to the market-based accountability that enables school principals to steer clear of additional pressure coming from parents and enrollment fluctuations.


Similar Titles:
Accountability tools in education and the configuration of the school-board institutional space: a Quebec-Ontario comparative case study.

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