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PRONADE schools in Guatemala: The rise and fall of a community schools program and the implications for improving school quality

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Abstract:

This panel will consider the retrospective research conducted by Alec Gershberg and Ben Meade on the National Program of Autonomous Educational Development, or PRONADE program of Guatemala. The PRONADE program were schools created, supported, and in part, managed by community members and received monitoring and support from contracted NGOs rather than the Guatemalan Ministry of Education (MINEDUC). Unlike traditional schools, PRONADE schools were staffed by contracted teachers who were hired by local communities. The schools for the most part were established in areas where primary access to education was inadequate. During this initial expansion of primary education, new PRONADE schools were shown to educate about half of the new students served during this period. At that time, the model appealed to policymakers, because PRONADE schools were faster and less expensive to put into operation than traditional schools. In part due to public dissatisfaction with the program stemming from allegations of corruption and pressure from the national teachers’ union, the program was eliminated in 2008 and PRONADE schools were converted into official schools.
This panel will examine the benefits and pitfalls of the PRONADE model and how the elimination of the program has affected education quality in the country’s rural schools. The panel will share lessons learned from the program and discuss the challenges faced in supporting education quality and school-based management with limited resources given the added difficulty of a weak state authority

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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492770_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Meade, Ben. and Gershberg, Alec. "PRONADE schools in Guatemala: The rise and fall of a community schools program and the implications for improving school quality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492770_index.html>

APA Citation:

Meade, B. and Gershberg, A. I. "PRONADE schools in Guatemala: The rise and fall of a community schools program and the implications for improving school quality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492770_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This panel will consider the retrospective research conducted by Alec Gershberg and Ben Meade on the National Program of Autonomous Educational Development, or PRONADE program of Guatemala. The PRONADE program were schools created, supported, and in part, managed by community members and received monitoring and support from contracted NGOs rather than the Guatemalan Ministry of Education (MINEDUC). Unlike traditional schools, PRONADE schools were staffed by contracted teachers who were hired by local communities. The schools for the most part were established in areas where primary access to education was inadequate. During this initial expansion of primary education, new PRONADE schools were shown to educate about half of the new students served during this period. At that time, the model appealed to policymakers, because PRONADE schools were faster and less expensive to put into operation than traditional schools. In part due to public dissatisfaction with the program stemming from allegations of corruption and pressure from the national teachers’ union, the program was eliminated in 2008 and PRONADE schools were converted into official schools.
This panel will examine the benefits and pitfalls of the PRONADE model and how the elimination of the program has affected education quality in the country’s rural schools. The panel will share lessons learned from the program and discuss the challenges faced in supporting education quality and school-based management with limited resources given the added difficulty of a weak state authority


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