Citation

Learning from hip-hop: Translanguaging pedagogies for multilingual Montreal classrooms

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Abstract:

Hip-hop culture is the single most influential force shaping contemporary urban youth culture in North America. The literature on multilingual code-switching by hip-hop-identified youth is growing (Higgins 2009; Pennycook 2004, 2007; Author, 2009) due to the coincidence of scholarly awareness of the significance of the mixing of people and languages across borders with hip-hop’s rise as an international youth movement. Academic attention to hip-hop and education argues for the need to bridge students’ out-of-school interests, skills, and cultural capital with school curriculum (Hill, 2009; Author, in press).The Montreal hip-hop community is possibly the site of the most multilingual mixing in North America. Through analysis of lyrics and interviews with artists and fans, we have found that for hip-hop-identified youth in multiethnic Montreal neighbourhoods, translanguaging is the default way of “languaging”, with implications for identity and community formation in the generation Lamarre et al (2002) term the “nouvelle francophonie”. However, the pedagogic significance of hip-hop translanguaging practices in and out of classrooms has not yet been explored (Alim’s (2004) work on using hip-hop for linguistic and critical language awareness education in bi-dialectal contexts is relevant). The rappers we have interviewed state, “We rap like we speak”; unsurprisingly, in the Quebec context, youth report that their teachers and parents feel their regular code-switching is a serious impediment to their mastery of French, the mandatory language of education for most students in the province. In this paper, we will explore the possibilities multilingual hip-hop offers for language instruction within multiethnic classrooms shaped by these multiple discursive practices (Hélot & de Mejia 2008; García 2009; Blackledge & Creese 2010). We argue that these rap lyrics can be resources for language awareness and critical language awareness pedagogies for teachers and students, and offer insight into the poetics of identity under conditions of globalization.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492826_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Low, Bronwen. "Learning from hip-hop: Translanguaging pedagogies for multilingual Montreal classrooms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492826_index.html>

APA Citation:

Low, B. , 2011-05-01 "Learning from hip-hop: Translanguaging pedagogies for multilingual Montreal classrooms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492826_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hip-hop culture is the single most influential force shaping contemporary urban youth culture in North America. The literature on multilingual code-switching by hip-hop-identified youth is growing (Higgins 2009; Pennycook 2004, 2007; Author, 2009) due to the coincidence of scholarly awareness of the significance of the mixing of people and languages across borders with hip-hop’s rise as an international youth movement. Academic attention to hip-hop and education argues for the need to bridge students’ out-of-school interests, skills, and cultural capital with school curriculum (Hill, 2009; Author, in press).The Montreal hip-hop community is possibly the site of the most multilingual mixing in North America. Through analysis of lyrics and interviews with artists and fans, we have found that for hip-hop-identified youth in multiethnic Montreal neighbourhoods, translanguaging is the default way of “languaging”, with implications for identity and community formation in the generation Lamarre et al (2002) term the “nouvelle francophonie”. However, the pedagogic significance of hip-hop translanguaging practices in and out of classrooms has not yet been explored (Alim’s (2004) work on using hip-hop for linguistic and critical language awareness education in bi-dialectal contexts is relevant). The rappers we have interviewed state, “We rap like we speak”; unsurprisingly, in the Quebec context, youth report that their teachers and parents feel their regular code-switching is a serious impediment to their mastery of French, the mandatory language of education for most students in the province. In this paper, we will explore the possibilities multilingual hip-hop offers for language instruction within multiethnic classrooms shaped by these multiple discursive practices (Hélot & de Mejia 2008; García 2009; Blackledge & Creese 2010). We argue that these rap lyrics can be resources for language awareness and critical language awareness pedagogies for teachers and students, and offer insight into the poetics of identity under conditions of globalization.


Similar Titles:
Learning the Language of Hip-Hop: Reading and Writing Critically with Hip-Hop in the Classroom

Does Your Pedagogy Include Hip-Hop? Embracing Critical Race Theory in the Classroom

“The Pedagogy of ‘Block Huggin’: Creating Sustainable Learning Environments for Young Men of Color Promoting Leadership, Mentorship and Love, within Hip Hop Culture Discourse”


 
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