Citation

When keeping it real goes wrong: African American Studies and its impact on students academic careers in other classrooms

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Abstract:

Introduction
African American Studies was born out of the Black student protests and Black Power Movement of the 1960s (Banks, 1996; Edwards, 1970; Hare, 1969a; 1969b; Karenga, 1993; Van Deburg, 1992;). During the late 1960s, many African American students who attended predominantly white colleges and universities demanded an educational approach that was relevant to the African American community (Edwards; Hamilton, 1970; Hare, 2007; Karenga,1993;). This approach to education needed to reflect the accurate history, culture, and struggle of African American people (Hare, 1969a; Karenga, 1993). At its inception, one of the major goals of Black Studies was to transform the academy and encourage the academy to present the experiences of Africans and African Americans more accurately (Hare, 1969a; 1969b;). The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ opinions and treatment in non-African American Studies courses when they attempt to challenge or question the information that teacher, professors, and instructors to present in their classrooms. Specifically,
1. How are African American Studies students treated in non-African American Studies courses?
2. How does this treatment impact the students’ opinions on the field of African American Studies?
Summary of Methods
Data for this study was collected using a mixed-methods design with qualitative methods being the dominant methodological approach used (Creswell, 1994). This methodological approach was selected because the vast majority of previous research conducted on students’ attitudes concerning African American Studies used quantitative methods and provided very little in-depth information concerning students’ attitudes (Johnson, 1984). Also, many of these quantitative studies failed to account for students’ attitudes and perceptions prior to their enrollment in African American Studies. .
Preliminary results indicate that many African American Studies majors and students who have taken several African American Studies courses encounter difficulty in attempting to question the information that teachers, professor, and instructors.
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Association:
Name: 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493053_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Spearman, Patrick. "When keeping it real goes wrong: African American Studies and its impact on students academic careers in other classrooms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493053_index.html>

APA Citation:

Spearman, P. T. , 2011-03-16 "When keeping it real goes wrong: African American Studies and its impact on students academic careers in other classrooms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493053_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Introduction
African American Studies was born out of the Black student protests and Black Power Movement of the 1960s (Banks, 1996; Edwards, 1970; Hare, 1969a; 1969b; Karenga, 1993; Van Deburg, 1992;). During the late 1960s, many African American students who attended predominantly white colleges and universities demanded an educational approach that was relevant to the African American community (Edwards; Hamilton, 1970; Hare, 2007; Karenga,1993;). This approach to education needed to reflect the accurate history, culture, and struggle of African American people (Hare, 1969a; Karenga, 1993). At its inception, one of the major goals of Black Studies was to transform the academy and encourage the academy to present the experiences of Africans and African Americans more accurately (Hare, 1969a; 1969b;). The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ opinions and treatment in non-African American Studies courses when they attempt to challenge or question the information that teacher, professors, and instructors to present in their classrooms. Specifically,
1. How are African American Studies students treated in non-African American Studies courses?
2. How does this treatment impact the students’ opinions on the field of African American Studies?
Summary of Methods
Data for this study was collected using a mixed-methods design with qualitative methods being the dominant methodological approach used (Creswell, 1994). This methodological approach was selected because the vast majority of previous research conducted on students’ attitudes concerning African American Studies used quantitative methods and provided very little in-depth information concerning students’ attitudes (Johnson, 1984). Also, many of these quantitative studies failed to account for students’ attitudes and perceptions prior to their enrollment in African American Studies. .
Preliminary results indicate that many African American Studies majors and students who have taken several African American Studies courses encounter difficulty in attempting to question the information that teachers, professor, and instructors.


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