Citation

Open a school, close a prison: Identity construction in the autobiographical narratives of incarcerated undergraduates

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Statistics from a study conducted by the Public Safety Performance Project show that on any given day in 2008, one in every one hundred adults was incarcerated in an American jail or prison. The cycle of poverty, incarceration, and re-incarceration has claimed too many lives and demands meaningful, successful offender rehabilitation. Prison university programs have become the focus of an increasing amount of research as they have generated some of the lowest recidivism rates of any programming available. Rather than seeking to further quantify this success, my research asks how students engage with the processes of education in an undergraduate program at a maximum-security prison in the United States. Data was generated and collected through six months of participant observation and two autobiographical writing workshops with program participants, conducted in order to discover what it means to be a college student in the larger context of the prison. My analysis draws heavily on sociocultural theory to explore how incarcerated undergraduates use the tools offered by membership in the figured world of the prison college to reframe their understanding of their own experiences. Content and compositional markers from their written narratives show how they regain the crucial sense of agency that prison is designed to take away, and in turn how that agency influences their behavior. These narratives begin to shed some light on the question of why participation in education while incarcerated seems to ‘work’ so well, and on how the beneficial aspects of this work can best be facilitated.

Author's Keywords:

Prison education, Narrative
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493067_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

McDowell, Lila. "Open a school, close a prison: Identity construction in the autobiographical narratives of incarcerated undergraduates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493067_index.html>

APA Citation:

McDowell, L. , 2011-04-30 "Open a school, close a prison: Identity construction in the autobiographical narratives of incarcerated undergraduates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493067_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Statistics from a study conducted by the Public Safety Performance Project show that on any given day in 2008, one in every one hundred adults was incarcerated in an American jail or prison. The cycle of poverty, incarceration, and re-incarceration has claimed too many lives and demands meaningful, successful offender rehabilitation. Prison university programs have become the focus of an increasing amount of research as they have generated some of the lowest recidivism rates of any programming available. Rather than seeking to further quantify this success, my research asks how students engage with the processes of education in an undergraduate program at a maximum-security prison in the United States. Data was generated and collected through six months of participant observation and two autobiographical writing workshops with program participants, conducted in order to discover what it means to be a college student in the larger context of the prison. My analysis draws heavily on sociocultural theory to explore how incarcerated undergraduates use the tools offered by membership in the figured world of the prison college to reframe their understanding of their own experiences. Content and compositional markers from their written narratives show how they regain the crucial sense of agency that prison is designed to take away, and in turn how that agency influences their behavior. These narratives begin to shed some light on the question of why participation in education while incarcerated seems to ‘work’ so well, and on how the beneficial aspects of this work can best be facilitated.


Similar Titles:
Using popular media to construct counter-narratives of race, language, and identity in urban high school English classrooms

Negotiating Imposed Identities: Identity Work and Narrative Construction by Black Self-Taught Artists

Narratives, Demolitions, and Identity: How the Demolition Mission (Re)Constructed the Lower 9th Ward’s Identity


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.