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Martin Luther King's Masculinity as Counter-Cultural, 1960-1968

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Abstract:

Martin Luther King’s political and ethical developments not only challenged dominant mainstream views, but they also worked together to create a counter-cultural masculinity that challenged American views of masculinity. King, along with other civil rights leaders, often couched black liberation in the masculine terms of reclaiming black manhood. Scholars have taken King and other leaders of the civil rights movement to task for espousing sexist and patriarchal rhetoric, but this only paints half of the picture. King encouraged black and white men to embody a masculinity that defied American preconceived notions about masculinity and manhood. Scholars have also noted King’s evolution from a local political consciousness to an international, revolutionary political consciousness, but they have not analyzed its implications and impact on representations of black masculinity.

Against the backdrop of America’s ideal man that was individualistic, fiercely competitive, pro-capitalist, and proponent of redemptive violence, King preached a message that encouraged men to be indebted to their communities to the point of self sacrifice and stressed the importance of community building within America and the international world. In addition, he was fiercely critical of the Vietnam War and American imperialism and capitalism, and it was all couched in the selfless practice of nonviolence. By reviewing a collection of King’s speeches, interviews, and publications, along with scholarly work analyzing gender and American masculinity in the period of 1960-1968, this paper will investigate King’s delivery of rhetoric, thoughts, and ideas embracing a counter-cultural masculinity.
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Association:
Name: 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493187_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Slade, Nikeeta. "Martin Luther King's Masculinity as Counter-Cultural, 1960-1968" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493187_index.html>

APA Citation:

Slade, N. , 2011-03-16 "Martin Luther King's Masculinity as Counter-Cultural, 1960-1968" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493187_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Martin Luther King’s political and ethical developments not only challenged dominant mainstream views, but they also worked together to create a counter-cultural masculinity that challenged American views of masculinity. King, along with other civil rights leaders, often couched black liberation in the masculine terms of reclaiming black manhood. Scholars have taken King and other leaders of the civil rights movement to task for espousing sexist and patriarchal rhetoric, but this only paints half of the picture. King encouraged black and white men to embody a masculinity that defied American preconceived notions about masculinity and manhood. Scholars have also noted King’s evolution from a local political consciousness to an international, revolutionary political consciousness, but they have not analyzed its implications and impact on representations of black masculinity.

Against the backdrop of America’s ideal man that was individualistic, fiercely competitive, pro-capitalist, and proponent of redemptive violence, King preached a message that encouraged men to be indebted to their communities to the point of self sacrifice and stressed the importance of community building within America and the international world. In addition, he was fiercely critical of the Vietnam War and American imperialism and capitalism, and it was all couched in the selfless practice of nonviolence. By reviewing a collection of King’s speeches, interviews, and publications, along with scholarly work analyzing gender and American masculinity in the period of 1960-1968, this paper will investigate King’s delivery of rhetoric, thoughts, and ideas embracing a counter-cultural masculinity.


Similar Titles:
"Shouldn't he love us, now that we love him?" The Politics of Race and Visual Culture in the Memorialization of Martin Luther King Jr.

The “eloquent Dr. King”: How E. O. Jackson and the Birmingham World Covered Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Citizen Economic Empowerment, Resident Stakeholders Resistance and the Transforming of the DC Central Library into the Martin Luther King Memorial Library –1960 -2005


 
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