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Imported teacher education curricula in the United Arab Emirates

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Abstract:

Educational borrowing and lending examines the political and economic reasons why governments turn to cross-national transfers when they need to solve educational problems at home (Steiner-Khamsi, 2004). In contrast to extensively studied borrowed reforms, borrowed curricula are often overlooked by researchers, especially borrowed teacher education curricula. What makes the latter import particularly problematic is the highly contextual and complex nature of teacher education, and the multifaceted roles that teachers are expected to perform in the societies.
Adopting the perspective of cross-national educational transfer (Phillips & Ochs, 2004), this paper examines the historical factors preceding the teacher education curriculum import and the effect of these factors on the choice of curriculum models adopted in the United Arab Emirates. What makes these imports interesting is the absence of a colonizing power forcing the national government to introduce these foreign products (Phillips & Ochs, 2003). Neither is there the economic pressure stemming from international aid agencies to adopt a foreign system as a condition for economic assistance (Steiner-Khamsi, 2008). Rather, the national government pursued importing foreign systems to meet its perceived needs. This case study challenges the traditional perception that “influences operating on the curriculum of teacher education derive from many sources including long-standing cultural, intellectual, and historical traditions” (Stuart and Tatto, 2000:497). In contrast to this perception, this paper illustrates that, in a new interconnected world, even such ideologically and culturally loaded constructs as teacher education programs can be mistakenly perceived as objects that can be decontextualized and transferred into new contexts.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493413_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Aydarova, Olena. "Imported teacher education curricula in the United Arab Emirates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493413_index.html>

APA Citation:

Aydarova, O. "Imported teacher education curricula in the United Arab Emirates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493413_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Educational borrowing and lending examines the political and economic reasons why governments turn to cross-national transfers when they need to solve educational problems at home (Steiner-Khamsi, 2004). In contrast to extensively studied borrowed reforms, borrowed curricula are often overlooked by researchers, especially borrowed teacher education curricula. What makes the latter import particularly problematic is the highly contextual and complex nature of teacher education, and the multifaceted roles that teachers are expected to perform in the societies.
Adopting the perspective of cross-national educational transfer (Phillips & Ochs, 2004), this paper examines the historical factors preceding the teacher education curriculum import and the effect of these factors on the choice of curriculum models adopted in the United Arab Emirates. What makes these imports interesting is the absence of a colonizing power forcing the national government to introduce these foreign products (Phillips & Ochs, 2003). Neither is there the economic pressure stemming from international aid agencies to adopt a foreign system as a condition for economic assistance (Steiner-Khamsi, 2008). Rather, the national government pursued importing foreign systems to meet its perceived needs. This case study challenges the traditional perception that “influences operating on the curriculum of teacher education derive from many sources including long-standing cultural, intellectual, and historical traditions” (Stuart and Tatto, 2000:497). In contrast to this perception, this paper illustrates that, in a new interconnected world, even such ideologically and culturally loaded constructs as teacher education programs can be mistakenly perceived as objects that can be decontextualized and transferred into new contexts.


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