Citation

Kuchota maji: Educational effects and community perceptions of girls’ workload in rural Tanzania

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Abstract:

In nations such as Tanzania, the geographical focus of this research, girls often complete a disproportionate amount of household work as compared to boys. The purpose of this research is to investigate how girls’ workload affects their participation in school and the perceptions of community members regarding the amounts and types of work deemed acceptable to be completed by girls. Drawing on the work of Amartya Sen and others, the authors posit that girls’ educational opportunities are severely constrained by external factors, many of which could be reduced or perhaps eliminated with practical, community-based interventions. Data used to support the authors’ claims are derived from multiple sources, including time-use journal entries completed by more than 1,500 students and in-depth household surveys with parents and their children. A variety of innovative research approaches were utilized in order to investigate the research questions. This mixed methods research, conducted by CARE International, highlights the importance of understanding community perceptions within the local context prior to initiating interventions. The findings also suggest that local logic regarding gendered interpretations of work bears significant impact on the lives of children living within the community, with specific factors having negative effects on their educational experiences.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493625_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lihwa, Flavian., Johnstone, Christopher. and Thomas, Matthew. "Kuchota maji: Educational effects and community perceptions of girls’ workload in rural Tanzania" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493625_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lihwa, F. , Johnstone, C. and Thomas, M. A. , 2011-04-30 "Kuchota maji: Educational effects and community perceptions of girls’ workload in rural Tanzania" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493625_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In nations such as Tanzania, the geographical focus of this research, girls often complete a disproportionate amount of household work as compared to boys. The purpose of this research is to investigate how girls’ workload affects their participation in school and the perceptions of community members regarding the amounts and types of work deemed acceptable to be completed by girls. Drawing on the work of Amartya Sen and others, the authors posit that girls’ educational opportunities are severely constrained by external factors, many of which could be reduced or perhaps eliminated with practical, community-based interventions. Data used to support the authors’ claims are derived from multiple sources, including time-use journal entries completed by more than 1,500 students and in-depth household surveys with parents and their children. A variety of innovative research approaches were utilized in order to investigate the research questions. This mixed methods research, conducted by CARE International, highlights the importance of understanding community perceptions within the local context prior to initiating interventions. The findings also suggest that local logic regarding gendered interpretations of work bears significant impact on the lives of children living within the community, with specific factors having negative effects on their educational experiences.


Similar Titles:
Girls' rural educational access with community help (Girls' REACH): Policies to increase girls' educational opportunities in rural Lao PDR

Community identified barriers to girls’ education in rural Malawi: What girls and boys say about absenteeism, repetition and drop out

Rural Girls Doing and Being Educated through Grass -Roots INGO’s: Examining Community Tensions and Transformations


 
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