Citation

What liberal ends might be achieved through teaching about minority religions in U.S. public schools?

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Abstract:

The idea of a “pure separation” between church and state in the public schools, and its accompanying notion of sterile as opposed to full neutrality with respect to religion in curriculum is complicated by the influx of religious minorities, who present to the American cultural landscape new value and belief systems. The issue is of concern to liberals, inasmuch as tolerance and respect for religious difference as well as exposure to a diverse range of viewpoints are germane to realizing democratic pluralism. This paper firstly examines “Islam: A Simulation of Islamic History and Culture”, an exercise geared toward middle school students which allows them to learn about Islam. It then moves to an analysis of the federal court case of Eklund v. Byron Union School District (2003), wherein parents of two California public school students filed suit claiming that the school’s use of the Islam simulation was in violation of the Establishment Clause. While the paper discusses the court’s rejection of the parents' claims and the support of the school's curricular decisions, analysis is concentrated on the degree to which the simulation and its implementation fulfilled key liberal ends, including exposure to diverse perspectives, and the capacity for reasonableness and for making deliberative judgments (De Ruyter and Merry, 2009; Kymlicka, 1995; Rawls, 1993). Notwithstanding the simulation’s use of select language and activities that might raise Establishment Clause concerns, the study finds that the simulation and its implementation as described in Eklund are generally in concert with fulfilling liberal ends.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493660_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Collet, Bruce. and Pauken, Patrick. "What liberal ends might be achieved through teaching about minority religions in U.S. public schools?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493660_index.html>

APA Citation:

Collet, B. and Pauken, P. , 2011-04-30 "What liberal ends might be achieved through teaching about minority religions in U.S. public schools?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493660_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The idea of a “pure separation” between church and state in the public schools, and its accompanying notion of sterile as opposed to full neutrality with respect to religion in curriculum is complicated by the influx of religious minorities, who present to the American cultural landscape new value and belief systems. The issue is of concern to liberals, inasmuch as tolerance and respect for religious difference as well as exposure to a diverse range of viewpoints are germane to realizing democratic pluralism. This paper firstly examines “Islam: A Simulation of Islamic History and Culture”, an exercise geared toward middle school students which allows them to learn about Islam. It then moves to an analysis of the federal court case of Eklund v. Byron Union School District (2003), wherein parents of two California public school students filed suit claiming that the school’s use of the Islam simulation was in violation of the Establishment Clause. While the paper discusses the court’s rejection of the parents' claims and the support of the school's curricular decisions, analysis is concentrated on the degree to which the simulation and its implementation fulfilled key liberal ends, including exposure to diverse perspectives, and the capacity for reasonableness and for making deliberative judgments (De Ruyter and Merry, 2009; Kymlicka, 1995; Rawls, 1993). Notwithstanding the simulation’s use of select language and activities that might raise Establishment Clause concerns, the study finds that the simulation and its implementation as described in Eklund are generally in concert with fulfilling liberal ends.


Similar Titles:
Religion, Liberalism, and ‘Shackled Tongues’: Re-evaluating the Case for Promoting Democracy in Public School Classrooms

Closing the Achievement Gap for Minorities; A Comparison Study of a Seconday Public School in London and a Middle School in Tampa


 
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