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Faculty barriers and enablers in establishing branch campuses abroad

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Abstract:

Exemplary international programs and initiatives succeed or fail based primarily on the dedication and capability of their faculty champions, their creative entrepreneurs (Wood, 2007). Lack of sustained faculty participation is one of the most serious challenges in maintaining a high quality education at campuses abroad. I identify and examine the barriers to faculty participation in international campuses abroad. Subsequently, I explore possible ways of overcoming those barriers.

Sustained faculty participation plays a crucial role in the success of international branch campuses. This is significant because of increasing globalization of higher education. According to the Institute of International Education’s article “Globalization and Higher Education: Eight Common Perceptions From University Leaders,” possessing knowledge and having the ability to apply it in a worldwide arena is imperative to personal and societal advancement. Moreover, a skilled and globally focused workforce is one of the most important ingredients to any country’s economic competitiveness in world where competitors can come from next door or halfway around the world. Wood argues in agreement that “any organization that does not support an environment that attracts, sustains and retains creative, imaginative, and globally resourceful individuals will eventually fall behind” (Wood, 2007, p. 1). The role of higher education is apparent as universities and colleges are considered by many to be the primary suppliers of such individuals (Wood 2007; Florida 2002; Friedman 2005).

This brings to fore the question: What motivates or hinders faculty participation in branch campuses?

To interpret the findings, three theoretical frameworks were chosen for guidance – the dualism of controls, shared governance, and the social exchange theory.

A combination of extrinsic/intrinsic and personal/professional factors that can either enable or hinder faculty from participating in international branch campuses were identified.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493864_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Ahmad, Seher. "Faculty barriers and enablers in establishing branch campuses abroad" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493864_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ahmad, S. , 2011-04-30 "Faculty barriers and enablers in establishing branch campuses abroad" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493864_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Exemplary international programs and initiatives succeed or fail based primarily on the dedication and capability of their faculty champions, their creative entrepreneurs (Wood, 2007). Lack of sustained faculty participation is one of the most serious challenges in maintaining a high quality education at campuses abroad. I identify and examine the barriers to faculty participation in international campuses abroad. Subsequently, I explore possible ways of overcoming those barriers.

Sustained faculty participation plays a crucial role in the success of international branch campuses. This is significant because of increasing globalization of higher education. According to the Institute of International Education’s article “Globalization and Higher Education: Eight Common Perceptions From University Leaders,” possessing knowledge and having the ability to apply it in a worldwide arena is imperative to personal and societal advancement. Moreover, a skilled and globally focused workforce is one of the most important ingredients to any country’s economic competitiveness in world where competitors can come from next door or halfway around the world. Wood argues in agreement that “any organization that does not support an environment that attracts, sustains and retains creative, imaginative, and globally resourceful individuals will eventually fall behind” (Wood, 2007, p. 1). The role of higher education is apparent as universities and colleges are considered by many to be the primary suppliers of such individuals (Wood 2007; Florida 2002; Friedman 2005).

This brings to fore the question: What motivates or hinders faculty participation in branch campuses?

To interpret the findings, three theoretical frameworks were chosen for guidance – the dualism of controls, shared governance, and the social exchange theory.

A combination of extrinsic/intrinsic and personal/professional factors that can either enable or hinder faculty from participating in international branch campuses were identified.


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