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Community, schooling and social networks for refugee youth

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Abstract:

This phenomenological study examines the schooling experiences of refugee children aged 6-8 in the US. The purpose of this empirical work is to uncover assumptions about newcomer children in US schools that directly impact the ability of schools to shape educational and social outcomes for refugee youth. This study contributes to informing social decision-making in moving education towards empowerment and fostering students’ agency through greater understanding and critical examination of assumptions of newcomer assimilation that are outdated in this globalized, intercultural era. These insights will lead to interventions and educational programs for all members of increasingly diverse school communities based on a greater understanding and critical examination of the school experiences of newcomer youth.
In order to probe effectively and creatively questions surrounding newcomer schooling and social integration, mixed methods comparative research is employed with newcomer youth and their native-born peers around their self-reported schooling experiences and social interactions. The relationship between public and political understandings of expectations of foreigners to the US (namely, critical assumptions of assimilation, see for example Gibson 1988; Ogbu 1978, 1987; Malkki, 1995, 1996), and the lived experiences of newcomer and native-born youth are juxtaposed to explore the overarching research questions. These questions emphasize the factors the youth themselves report in the ability to forge supportive relationships with their peers, teachers and other professionals in their schools. A focus of this research is on questions around community, schooling, and social networks in order to deeply challenge the ways in which schools unintentionally naturalize social stratification and legitimate non-intervention.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493873_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Mosselson, Jacqueline. "Community, schooling and social networks for refugee youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493873_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mosselson, J. , 2011-05-01 "Community, schooling and social networks for refugee youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493873_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This phenomenological study examines the schooling experiences of refugee children aged 6-8 in the US. The purpose of this empirical work is to uncover assumptions about newcomer children in US schools that directly impact the ability of schools to shape educational and social outcomes for refugee youth. This study contributes to informing social decision-making in moving education towards empowerment and fostering students’ agency through greater understanding and critical examination of assumptions of newcomer assimilation that are outdated in this globalized, intercultural era. These insights will lead to interventions and educational programs for all members of increasingly diverse school communities based on a greater understanding and critical examination of the school experiences of newcomer youth.
In order to probe effectively and creatively questions surrounding newcomer schooling and social integration, mixed methods comparative research is employed with newcomer youth and their native-born peers around their self-reported schooling experiences and social interactions. The relationship between public and political understandings of expectations of foreigners to the US (namely, critical assumptions of assimilation, see for example Gibson 1988; Ogbu 1978, 1987; Malkki, 1995, 1996), and the lived experiences of newcomer and native-born youth are juxtaposed to explore the overarching research questions. These questions emphasize the factors the youth themselves report in the ability to forge supportive relationships with their peers, teachers and other professionals in their schools. A focus of this research is on questions around community, schooling, and social networks in order to deeply challenge the ways in which schools unintentionally naturalize social stratification and legitimate non-intervention.


Similar Titles:
Networks and School Community: How social, human, and material resources influence school community

University-School-Community Partnerships and Social Network Development: Examining the Professional Development School Context


 
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