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China’s economic development, higher education policies and higher education access in a world setting

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Abstract:

China’s participation in the global economy and its transition from a planned economy to a market economy have driven a rapid higher education (HE) expansion. This study positions China in a world setting and examines the influences of economic growth, education finance policies, the educational system and demographic changes on college access in China. To illustrate China's uniqueness and commonalities, this study compares China's data with aggregated data of 100 developed, developing and least developed countries and reviews literature on new growth theory (Romer, 1990; 1994), social justice theory (Friedman, 2005; Rawls, 1999, 2001) and policy practices across countries.

China’s economic growth has strongly driven HE access because it substantially increased citizens’ financial ability to pay the costs of HE. However, it intensified the influence of economic disparities, largely visible through unequal access between rural and urban students as well as between eastern and western regions.

The role of education finance policies in promoting equal access to HE is too limited to mitigate the negative influence of income disparities in China. To drive economic growth, China’s strategic planning for developing HE led to skewed resource allocation favoring HE over basic education. The skew has infringed upon the resources to basic education and thus equality of education. Moreover, the role of institutional expenditure on access is unclear, and the insufficient student financial aid programs only have very limited influence on HE access. The lack of effective financial policies in assuring equal access has left market forces to dominate the distribution of HE opportunities. The privatization and cost-sharing strategies for financing HE tends to worsen the urban-rural and regional inequalities in HE access.

China’s triangular relationship among economy, education finance and access is compounded by the secondary tracking (vocational vs. academic) system and demographic changes (total population, family planning policy, rural population).
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Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493880_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Yang, Lijing. "China’s economic development, higher education policies and higher education access in a world setting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493880_index.html>

APA Citation:

Yang, L. , 2011-05-01 "China’s economic development, higher education policies and higher education access in a world setting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493880_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: China’s participation in the global economy and its transition from a planned economy to a market economy have driven a rapid higher education (HE) expansion. This study positions China in a world setting and examines the influences of economic growth, education finance policies, the educational system and demographic changes on college access in China. To illustrate China's uniqueness and commonalities, this study compares China's data with aggregated data of 100 developed, developing and least developed countries and reviews literature on new growth theory (Romer, 1990; 1994), social justice theory (Friedman, 2005; Rawls, 1999, 2001) and policy practices across countries.

China’s economic growth has strongly driven HE access because it substantially increased citizens’ financial ability to pay the costs of HE. However, it intensified the influence of economic disparities, largely visible through unequal access between rural and urban students as well as between eastern and western regions.

The role of education finance policies in promoting equal access to HE is too limited to mitigate the negative influence of income disparities in China. To drive economic growth, China’s strategic planning for developing HE led to skewed resource allocation favoring HE over basic education. The skew has infringed upon the resources to basic education and thus equality of education. Moreover, the role of institutional expenditure on access is unclear, and the insufficient student financial aid programs only have very limited influence on HE access. The lack of effective financial policies in assuring equal access has left market forces to dominate the distribution of HE opportunities. The privatization and cost-sharing strategies for financing HE tends to worsen the urban-rural and regional inequalities in HE access.

China’s triangular relationship among economy, education finance and access is compounded by the secondary tracking (vocational vs. academic) system and demographic changes (total population, family planning policy, rural population).


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