Citation

Islamic education in Bangladesh: Liberates or hinders female participation for development?

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper critically analyzes the role of Islamic Education (Madrassah) in the female literacy of Bangladesh. Female education is a crucial part for development of this country, one of most populous in the world. Bangladesh’s policymakers have identified gender empowerment through education as an essential element of overall development. At present, the national literacy rate among people age fifteen and over is 47.9 percent, with male literacy rates significantly higher than female (54 percent versus 41.4). The government sponsored Islamic Education System (Madrassah) enrolls a large portion of such female students. This research has found that in the 1980s, female students comprised only 5 to 7 percent of the total Madrassah student population, but with increased government and international aid beginning in the 1990s, the scenario changed dramatically. During this time, the government included Madrassahs in its teacher and staff training and curriculum development programs, and extended public school incentives (such as free books and uniforms) to its students. Coupled with the social pressures to send children to religious schools, this mainstream assistance significantly boosted female student enrollment in Madrassahs. Now nearly 50 percent of the 5 million Madrassah students at the primary and secondary levels are female. Does this religious education help to “liberate” the female students intellectually as well as socio-economically? Can the female students become as empowered as their peers in the general education system and join the mainstream workforce locally/internationally? Does higher female enrollment in religious education mean the emergence of a reclusive society or an enlightened one? The paper tries to answer such questions using survey analysis, interviews, and literature reviews. Initial findings have indicated the emergence of Madrassah Education for women as one of the key enablers of development in Bangladesh.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493894_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Hussain, Faheem. and Naumi, Fabiha. "Islamic education in Bangladesh: Liberates or hinders female participation for development?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493894_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hussain, F. and Naumi, F. , 2011-05-01 "Islamic education in Bangladesh: Liberates or hinders female participation for development?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493894_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper critically analyzes the role of Islamic Education (Madrassah) in the female literacy of Bangladesh. Female education is a crucial part for development of this country, one of most populous in the world. Bangladesh’s policymakers have identified gender empowerment through education as an essential element of overall development. At present, the national literacy rate among people age fifteen and over is 47.9 percent, with male literacy rates significantly higher than female (54 percent versus 41.4). The government sponsored Islamic Education System (Madrassah) enrolls a large portion of such female students. This research has found that in the 1980s, female students comprised only 5 to 7 percent of the total Madrassah student population, but with increased government and international aid beginning in the 1990s, the scenario changed dramatically. During this time, the government included Madrassahs in its teacher and staff training and curriculum development programs, and extended public school incentives (such as free books and uniforms) to its students. Coupled with the social pressures to send children to religious schools, this mainstream assistance significantly boosted female student enrollment in Madrassahs. Now nearly 50 percent of the 5 million Madrassah students at the primary and secondary levels are female. Does this religious education help to “liberate” the female students intellectually as well as socio-economically? Can the female students become as empowered as their peers in the general education system and join the mainstream workforce locally/internationally? Does higher female enrollment in religious education mean the emergence of a reclusive society or an enlightened one? The paper tries to answer such questions using survey analysis, interviews, and literature reviews. Initial findings have indicated the emergence of Madrassah Education for women as one of the key enablers of development in Bangladesh.


Similar Titles:
The Impact of Neo-liberalism in Education Policy-Making in Developing Countries: A Comparative Analysis of Pakistan and Tanzania

The Decade of Education for Sustainable Development: Educational Initiatives as Promoting Citizen Participation - The Cases of Chile and Brazil

Liberation or marginalization: An investigation of school climate, adolescent ethnic identity, and educational participation

Labor Force Participation in Puerto Rico: Male and Female Cohort Differences in the Process of Development


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.