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Tradition, transition, and language: The struggle for the Moroccan curriculum in the Twentieth century

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Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to examine the history of Moroccan education in the 20th century, with the specific focus on the Moroccan curriculum before, during and after the French protectorate. As a complex land of multilingualism, multiculturalism, political liberalization and economic reform, Morocco has sustained many struggles over what should be in the curriculum and how it should be implemented. With the advent of the French protectorate in 1912, and Morocco’s first resident general, Marshall Louis Hubert Lyautey, the education system and curriculum shifted from Quranic-based lessons to Western-style education system that more closely resembled that of similar French colonies in Africa, and thus seemingly propelled Morocco in to a more modern schooling structure through what can be argued as an indoctrinating curriculum. As a result, and following the fall of the protectorate in 1956, questions of nationalism and multilingualism have fueled the debate over the education system in Morocco, furthering the struggle for a truly Moroccan curriculum. Combining a historical overview with an evaluation of current programs and paradigms in Moroccan education, this paper aims to explore how multilingualism in Morocco factors in curricular development and ways in which students shape their own cultural identities through education.
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Association:
Name: 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493916_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Brown, James. "Tradition, transition, and language: The struggle for the Moroccan curriculum in the Twentieth century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493916_index.html>

APA Citation:

Brown, J. S. "Tradition, transition, and language: The struggle for the Moroccan curriculum in the Twentieth century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493916_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the history of Moroccan education in the 20th century, with the specific focus on the Moroccan curriculum before, during and after the French protectorate. As a complex land of multilingualism, multiculturalism, political liberalization and economic reform, Morocco has sustained many struggles over what should be in the curriculum and how it should be implemented. With the advent of the French protectorate in 1912, and Morocco’s first resident general, Marshall Louis Hubert Lyautey, the education system and curriculum shifted from Quranic-based lessons to Western-style education system that more closely resembled that of similar French colonies in Africa, and thus seemingly propelled Morocco in to a more modern schooling structure through what can be argued as an indoctrinating curriculum. As a result, and following the fall of the protectorate in 1956, questions of nationalism and multilingualism have fueled the debate over the education system in Morocco, furthering the struggle for a truly Moroccan curriculum. Combining a historical overview with an evaluation of current programs and paradigms in Moroccan education, this paper aims to explore how multilingualism in Morocco factors in curricular development and ways in which students shape their own cultural identities through education.


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